Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Relationship between behavioural response to amphetamine and propensity to develop stereotypic behaviour in pigs

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 November 2017


E M C Terlouw
Affiliation:
The Scottish Agricultural College Edinburgh West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JG
A B Lawrence
Affiliation:
The Scottish Agricultural College Edinburgh West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JG
A W lllius
Affiliation:
Institute of Cell, Animal and Population Biology University of Edinburgh, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JN

Get access

Extract

The dopamine systems In the brain are strongly involved in motor activity. Pharmacological stimulation of brain dopamine systems with dopamine agonists initially results in increased levels of motor activity that with increasing doses become more stereotyped in form. It has been suggested that in tethered sows, stereotypies develop because chronic environmental stress produces activation of brain dopamine systems (Dantzer, 1986). Furthermore, differences In the sensitivity of brain dopamine systems may form the basis of the large individual variation found in level of stereotypies (Segal and Kuczenski, 1987). Manipulation of the chain forms the major category of stereotypic behaviour during long term tethering. In addition, many pigs develop excessive drinking (Terlouw et al., in press). The present study investigated whether female nulliparous pigs differed in their response to a standard dose of amphetamine and whether this response is correlated to the amount of chain activity and drinking that developed during subsequent long term tethering.


Type
Pig behaviour
Copyright
Copyright © The British Society of Animal Production 1991

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Dantzer, R. 1986. Behavioural, physiological and functional aspects of stereotyped behaviour: a review and a re-interpretation. J Anim Scl 62: 17761786 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lawrence, A B. The application of electronics to the study of animal behaviour. 1990. Anim Prod 50:574 Google Scholar
Segal, S and Kuczenski, R. 1987. Individual differences in responsiveness to single and repeated amphetamine administration: behavioural characteristics and neurochemical correlates. J Pharm Exp Therap 242: 917926.Google ScholarPubMed
Terlouw, E M C, Lawrence, A B and lllius, A W. Influences of feeding level and physical restriction on development of stereotypies in sows. Anim Behav, in press.Google Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 1 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 24th November 2017 - 4th December 2020. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Hostname: page-component-b4dcdd7-xrv4g Total loading time: 0.276 Render date: 2020-12-04T20:50:58.090Z Query parameters: { "hasAccess": "0", "openAccess": "0", "isLogged": "0", "lang": "en" } Feature Flags last update: Fri Dec 04 2020 19:59:53 GMT+0000 (Coordinated Universal Time) Feature Flags: { "metrics": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "peerReview": true, "crossMark": true, "comments": true, "relatedCommentaries": true, "subject": true, "clr": false, "languageSwitch": true }

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Relationship between behavioural response to amphetamine and propensity to develop stereotypic behaviour in pigs
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Relationship between behavioural response to amphetamine and propensity to develop stereotypic behaviour in pigs
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Relationship between behavioural response to amphetamine and propensity to develop stereotypic behaviour in pigs
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *