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The use of an invitational letter to increase the vaccine uptake of patients with coeliac disease

  • Joseph Moneim (a1), Hera Asad (a1), Eman Butt (a1), Jamil Shah Foridi (a1), Yasmin Khan (a1), Safwaan Patel (a1), Jawad Qureshi (a1) and Ravi Thakar (a1)...

Abstract

Aim:

We sought to establish the impact on vaccine uptake of sending out a single appointment letter inviting patients to attend a vaccine clinic.

Background:

Coeliac disease is associated with splenic dysfunction and so patients with coeliac disease are at a higher risk of overwhelming infection. Additional vaccinations are recommended for these individuals to provide additional protection against infection.

Methods:

We retrospectively identified 54 patients with diagnosed coeliac disease, and all vaccines previously received by these patients. By comparing this to the Green Book [Department of Health (2013) Immunisation of individuals with underlying medical conditions: the green book, chapter 7, London: Department of Health. Retrieved 26 February 2019 from https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/566853/Green_Book_Chapter7.pdf], we determined the patients who were due vaccinations and the specific vaccines they were due. An invitation letter was then sent out to patients requiring further vaccinations and vaccine uptake for these patients was re-audited six months later.

Findings:

Our results show a mild increase in the total uptake of vaccines six months after the letter was sent out, from 38.6% to 49.2%.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

Author for correspondence: Joseph Moneim, School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK. E-mail: jm946@cam.ac.uk

References

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Department of Health (2013) Immunisation of individuals with underlying medical conditions: the green book, chapter 7, London: Department of Health. Retrieved 26 February 2019 from https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/566853/Green_Book_Chapter7.pdf
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Keywords

The use of an invitational letter to increase the vaccine uptake of patients with coeliac disease

  • Joseph Moneim (a1), Hera Asad (a1), Eman Butt (a1), Jamil Shah Foridi (a1), Yasmin Khan (a1), Safwaan Patel (a1), Jawad Qureshi (a1) and Ravi Thakar (a1)...

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