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Promoting cross-jurisdictional primary health care research: developing a set of common indicators across 12 community-based primary health care teams in Canada

  • Sabrina T. Wong (a1), Julia M. Langton (a2), Alan Katz (a3), Martin Fortin (a4), Marshall Godwin (a5), Michael Green (a6), Eva Grunfeld (a7) (a8), Kasra Hassani (a1), Claire Kendall (a9), Clare Liddy (a9), Jenny Ploeg (a10), Walter P. Wodchis (a11) and Jeannie L. Haggerty (a12)...

Abstract

Aim

To describe the process by which the 12 community-based primary health care (CBPHC) research teams worked together and fostered cross-jurisdictional collaboration, including collection of common indicators with the goal of using the same measures and data sources.

Background

A pan-Canadian mechanism for common measurement of the impact of primary care innovations across Canada is lacking. The Canadian Institutes for Health Research and its partners funded 12 teams to conduct research and collaborate on development of a set of commonly collected indicators.

Methods

A working group representing the 12 teams was established. They undertook an iterative process to consider existing primary care indicators identified from the literature and by stakeholders. Indicators were agreed upon with the intention of addressing three objectives across the 12 teams: (1) describing the impact of improving access to CBPHC; (2) examining the impact of alternative models of chronic disease prevention and management in CBPHC; and (3) describing the structures and context that influence the implementation, delivery, cost, and potential for scale-up of CBPHC innovations.

Findings

Nineteen common indicators within the core dimensions of primary care were identified: access, comprehensiveness, coordination, effectiveness, and equity. We also agreed to collect data on health care costs and utilization within each team. Data sources include surveys, health administrative data, interviews, focus groups, and case studies. Collaboration across these teams sets the foundation for a unique opportunity for new knowledge generation, over and above any knowledge developed by any one team. Keys to success are each team’s willingness to engage and commitment to working across teams, funding to support this collaboration, and distributed leadership across the working group. Reaching consensus on collection of common indicators is challenging but achievable.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits nrestricted re-se, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

Author for correspondence: Sabrina T. Wong, Centre for Health Services and Policy Research; and School of Nursing, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T-2B5, Canada. E-mail: sabrina.wong@ubc.ca

Footnotes

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a

Centre intégré universitaire de santé et de services sociaux du Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean, Chicoutimi, Québec, Canada.

Footnotes

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Keywords

Promoting cross-jurisdictional primary health care research: developing a set of common indicators across 12 community-based primary health care teams in Canada

  • Sabrina T. Wong (a1), Julia M. Langton (a2), Alan Katz (a3), Martin Fortin (a4), Marshall Godwin (a5), Michael Green (a6), Eva Grunfeld (a7) (a8), Kasra Hassani (a1), Claire Kendall (a9), Clare Liddy (a9), Jenny Ploeg (a10), Walter P. Wodchis (a11) and Jeannie L. Haggerty (a12)...

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