Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

General practitioners with special interests: the potential benefits and possible risks for primary care

  • Stephanie Honey (a1), Neil Small (a1) and Shahid Ali (a2)

Abstract

General practitioners have always had special interests. Recent policy initiatives in the UK, organizational changes and changing attitudes by the Royal Colleges have meant that there is an increasing interest in the development of a new role for GPs with special interests (GPSIs). This paper considers what methodology is best suited to examining change, while that change is still developing. Specifically, it offers a model that identifies different forms of knowledge; anticipated, explicit and tacit and considers how these can combine in an evaluative model for innovations in primary care. The paper goes on to identify potential benefits and risks of a shift towards GPSIs. It develops a picture of GPSI services in one PCT and focuses on two disciplines, orthopaedic medicine and urology. Views of those GPs providing these services are reported and are linked with the possibilities that a new form of general practice might emerge without general practitioners.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      General practitioners with special interests: the potential benefits and possible risks for primary care
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      General practitioners with special interests: the potential benefits and possible risks for primary care
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      General practitioners with special interests: the potential benefits and possible risks for primary care
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

Address for correspondence: Dr Stephanie Honey, School of Health Studies, University of Bradford, 25 Trinity Road, Bradford BD5 0BB, UK. Email: s.a.honey@bradford.ac.uk

Keywords

General practitioners with special interests: the potential benefits and possible risks for primary care

  • Stephanie Honey (a1), Neil Small (a1) and Shahid Ali (a2)

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed