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Emergency Medical Service (EMS) Utilization by Syrian Refugees Residing in Ankara, Turkey

  • Ali Osman Altıner (a1) and Sıdıka Tekeli Yeşil (a2)

Abstract

Introduction

Many Syrians have left their country and migrated to other countries since March 2011, due to the civil war. As of March 2016, a total of 2,747,946 Syrian refugees had immigrated to Turkey. Some Syrian refugees have been living in camps, while 2,475,134 have been living in metropolitan areas, such as Ankara.

Study Objective

This study investigated Emergency Medical Service (EMS) utilization among Syrian refugees residing in Ankara.

Methods

This study was a descriptive, cross-sectional database analysis using data obtained from the Department of EMS of the Ankara Provincial Health Directorate.

Conclusion

Five stations in the Altındağ region of Ankara responded to 42% of all calls from Syrian refugees. Prehospital EMS in Ankara have been used mostly by Syrian refugees younger than 18-years-old. Study findings also suggest that medical staff in regions where Syrian refugees are likely to be treated should be supported and provided with the ability to overcome language barriers and cultural differences.

Altıner AO , Tekeli Yeşil S . Emergency Medical Service (EMS) Utilization by Syrian Refugees Residing in Ankara, Turkey. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2018;33(2):160164.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Correspondence: Sıdıka Tekeli Yeşil, MPH, PhD Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute Department of Medicine, Clinical Research Unit P.O. Box 4002 Basel, Switzerland E-mail: sidika.tekeli-yesil@swisstph.ch

Footnotes

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Conflicts of interest: none

Footnotes

References

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1. El-Khatib, Z, Scales, D, Vearey, J, Forsberg, BC. Syrian refugees, between rocky crisis in Syria and hard inaccessibility to healthcare services in Lebanon and Jordan. Confl Health. 2013;7(1):18.
2. The UN Refugee Agency. 2015. http://data.unhcr.org/syrianrefugees/regional.php. Accessed December 20, 2015.
3. Ministry of Interior Directorate General Migration Management, Turkey. 2016. www.goc.gov.tr. Accessed March 21, 2016.
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