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Introduction to the Special Issue

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 January 2017

Jeff Gill
Affiliation:
Department of Political Science, University of California, Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616. e-mail: jgill@ucdavis.edu
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Extract

Welcome to the special issue of Political Analysis dedicated to Bayesian methods. We hope that you enjoy the varied and interesting contributions herein featuring Bayesian statistical methods. For many people in empirical political science, Bayesian statistics seems like a weird offshoot of probability that surfaces occasionally in journals and books but does not occupy a particularly central role. This perception appears to be changing. In fact, it appears to be changing quite rapidly. The purpose of this issue is to support and accelerate this momentum by further demonstrating the full flexibility and power of Bayesian methodology.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Political Methodology 2004 

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