Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55597f9d44-54jdg Total loading time: 0.401 Render date: 2022-08-09T22:38:04.619Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Mediating effect of interpersonal coping on meaning in spirituality and quality of life and the influences of depression and anxiety thereon in cancer patients

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 November 2018

Kyeong Min Cha
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon, South Korea
So Young Kang
Affiliation:
Office of Biostatistics, Institute of Medical Sciences, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon, South Korea
So Yeon Hyun
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon, South Korea
Jae Sung Noh
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon, South Korea
Yun Mi Shin
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon, South Korea
Nam Hee Kim*
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, National Center for Mental Health, Seoul, South Korea
*
Author for correspondence: Nam Hee Kim, M.D., Ph.D., Department of Psychiatry, National Center for Mental Health, 127 Youngmasan-ro, Gwangjin-gu, Seoul 04933, South Korea. E-mail: nadianam@gmail.com

Abstract

Objective

This study aimed to investigate associations among spirituality, coping strategies, quality of life (QOL), and the effects of depression and anxiety thereon in cancer patients.

Method

In total, 237 cancer patients referred to a psycho-oncology clinic at a university hospital in Korea were enrolled. After identifying predictors of patient QOL in a stepwise regression model, we developed a hypothetical path model wherein interpersonal coping was considered as a mediating variable between spirituality (meaning/peace) and QOL and wherein depression and anxiety affected each of these three variables.

Result

The direct effect of spirituality (meaning/peace) on QOL was 36.7%. In an indirect model, interpersonal coping significantly mediated the relationship between spirituality (meaning/peace) and QOL. Depression exerted the largest negative effect on spirituality (meaning/peace), interpersonal coping, and QOL. Anxiety had negative effects on spirituality (meaning/peace) and QOL, but a positive effect on interpersonal coping.

Significance of results

Interpersonal coping strategies work as a partial mediator of the relationship between meaning/peace subscales of spirituality and QOL. Effective management of depression may help in achieving better outcomes associated therewith. Greater attention and efforts to improve social connectedness and meaning of life in spiritual well-being may improve the QOL of cancer patients.

Type
Original Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2018 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Footnotes

*

These authors contributed equally and should be considered co-first authors.

References

Aarts, JW, Deckx, L, van Abbema, DL, et al. (2015) The relation between depression, coping and health locus of control: Differences between older and younger patients, with and without cancer. Psycho-Oncology 24(8), 950957.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ahmadi, F, Park, J, Kim, KM, et al. (2016) Exploring existential coping resources: The perspective of Koreans with cancer. Journal of Religion and Health 55(6), 20532068.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Badger, TA, Segrin, C, Hepworth, JT, et al. (2013) Telephone-delivered health education and interpersonal counseling improve quality of life for Latinas with breast cancer and their supportive partners. Psycho-Oncology 22(5), 10351042.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bai, M and Lazenby, M (2015) A systematic review of associations between spiritual well-being and quality of life at the scale and factor levels in studies among patients with cancer. Journal of Palliative Medicine 18(3), 286298.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Biccheri, E, Roussiau, N, and Mambet-Doue, C (2016) Fibromyalgia, spirituality, coping and quality of life. Journal of Religion and Health 55(4), 11891197.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bovero, A, Leombruni, P, Miniotti, M, et al. (2016) Spirituality, quality of life, psychological adjustment in terminal cancer patients in hospice. European Journal of Cancer Care (English Language Edition) 25(6), 961969.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bredle, JM, Salsman, JM, Debb, SM, et al. (2011) Spiritual well-being as a component of health-related quality of life: The Functional Assessment Of Chronic Illness Therapy-Spiritual Well-Being Scale (FACIT-Sp). Religions 2(1), 7794.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Brown, AJ, Sun, CC, Urbauer, D, et al. (2015). Targeting those with decreased meaning and peace: a supportive care opportunity. Supportive Care in Cancer 23(7), 20252032.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Cella, DF, Tulsky, DS, Gray, G, et al. (1993) The Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy scale: Development and validation of the general measure. Journal of Clinical Oncology 11(3), 570579.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Chan, CM, Wan Ahmad, WA, Yusof, MM, et al. (2015) Effects of depression and anxiety on mortality in a mixed cancer group: A longitudinal approach using standardised diagnostic interviews. Psycho-Oncology 24(6), 718725.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
De Aguiar, SS, Bergmann, A, and Mattos, IE (2014) Quality of life as a predictor of overall survival after breast cancer treatment. Quality of Life Research 23(2), 627637.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ferrell, B (2007) Meeting spiritual needs: What is an oncologist to do? Journal of Clinical Oncology 25(5), 467468.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Figueiredo, MI, Fries, E, and Ingram, KM (2004) The role of disclosure patterns and unsupportive social interactions in the well-being of breast cancer patients. Psycho-Oncology 13(2), 96105.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Garssen, B (2004) Psychological factors and cancer development: Evidence after 30 years of research. Clinical Psychology Review 24(3), 315338.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gonzalez, P, Castaneda, SF, Dale, J, et al. (2014). Spiritual well-being and depressive symptoms among cancer survivors. Supportive Care in Cancer 22(9), 23932400.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Hill, EM (2016) Quality of life and mental health among women with ovarian cancer: Examining the role of emotional and instrumental social support seeking. Psychology, Health & Medicine 21(5), 551561.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Hinzey, A, Gaudier-Diaz, MM, Lustberg, MB, et al. (2016) Breast cancer and social environment: Getting by with a little help from our friends. Breast Cancer Research 18(1), 54.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Hocker, A, Krull, A, Koch, U, et al. (2014) Exploring spiritual needs and their associated factors in an urban sample of early and advanced cancer patients. European Journal of Cancer Care (English Language Edition) 23(6), 786794.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hooper, D, Coughlan, J, and Mullen, M (2008) Structural equation modelling: guidelines for determining model fit. Electronic Journal of Business Research Methods 6(1), 5360.Google Scholar
Kim, JN, Kwon, JH, Kim, SY, et al. (2004) Validation of Korean-cancer coping questionnaire (K-CCQ). Korean Journal of Health Psychology 9(2), 395414.Google Scholar
Lee, EH, Chun, M, Kang, S, et al. (2004) Validation of the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General (FACT-G) scale for measuring the health-related quality of life in Korean women with breast cancer. Japanese Journal of Clinical Oncology 34(7), 393399.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lo, C, Zimmermann, C, Gagliese, L, et al. (2011) Sources of spiritual well-being in advanced cancer. BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care 1(2), 149153.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lutgendorf, SK, De Geest, K, Bender, D, et al. (2012). Social influences on clinical outcomes of patients with ovarian cancer. Journal of Clinical Oncology 30(23), 28852890.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Manne, S and Badr, H (2008) Intimacy and relationship processes in couples' psychosocial adaptation to cancer. Cancer 112(11 Suppl), 25412555.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McClain, CS, Rosenfeld, B, and Breitbart, W (2003) Effect of spiritual well-being on end-of-life despair in terminally-ill cancer patients. Lancet 361(9369), 16031607.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Mehrabi, E, Hajian, S, Simbar, M, et al. (2015) Coping response following a diagnosis of breast cancer: A systematic review. Electronic Physician 7(8), 15751583.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Michael, YL, Berkman, LF, Colditz, GA, et al. (2002) Social networks and health-related quality of life in breast cancer survivors: A prospective study. Journal of Psychosomatic Research 52(5), 285293.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Montazeri, A (2009) Quality of life data as prognostic indicators of survival in cancer patients: An overview of the literature from 1982 to 2008. Health and Quality of Life Outcomes 7, 102.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Moorey, S, Frampton, M, and Greer, S (2003) The Cancer Coping Questionnaire: A self-rating scale for measuring the impact of adjuvant psychological therapy on coping behaviour. Psycho-Oncology 12(4), 331344.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Munoz, AR, Salsman, JM, Stein, KD, et al. (2015) Reference values of the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Spiritual Well-Being: A report from the American Cancer Society's studies of cancer survivors. Cancer 121(11), 18381844.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Musarezaie, A, Moeini, M, Taleghani, F, et al. (2014) Does spiritual care program affect levels of depression in patients with Leukemia? A randomized clinical trial. Journal of Education and Health Promotion 3, 96.Google ScholarPubMed
Noorani, NH and Montagnini, M (2007) Recognizing depression in palliative care patients. Journal of Palliative Medicine 10(2), 458464.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Peterman, AH, Fitchett, G, Brady, MJ, et al. (2002) Measuring spiritual well-being in people with cancer: The functional assessment of chronic illness therapy--Spiritual Well-being Scale (FACIT-Sp). Annals of Behavioral Medicine 24(1), 4958.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Puchalski, CM (2012) Spirituality in the cancer trajectory. Annals of Oncology 23(Suppl 3), 4955.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Sherman, AC, Merluzzi, TV, Pustejovsky, JE, et al. (2015) A meta-analytic review of religious or spiritual involvement and social health among cancer patients. Cancer 121(21), 37793788.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Shim, EJ, Shin, YW, Jeon, HJ, et al. (2008) Distress and its correlates in Korean cancer patients: Pilot use of the distress thermometer and the problem list. Psycho-Oncology 17(6), 548555.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Silva, SM, Crespo, C, and Canavarro, MC (2012) Pathways for psychological adjustment in breast cancer: A longitudinal study on coping strategies and posttraumatic growth. Psychology & Health 27(11), 13231341.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Sorato, DB and Osorio, FL (2015) Coping, psychopathology, and quality of life in cancer patients under palliative care. Palliative & Supportive Care 13(3), 517525.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Spiegel, D (2001) Mind matters. Coping and cancer progression. Journal of Psychosomatic Research 50(5), 287290.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Sulmasy, DP (2002) A biopsychosocial-spiritual model for the care of patients at the end of life. Gerontologist 42(Spec No 3), 2433.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Swinton, J, Bain, V., Ingram, S, et al. (2011) Moving inwards, moving outwards, moving upwards: The role of spirituality during the early stages of breast cancer. European Journal of Cancer Care (English Language Edition) 20(5), 640652.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Thomas, LP, Meier, EA, and Irwin, SA (2014) Meaning-centered psychotherapy: A form of psychotherapy for patients with cancer. Current Psychiatry Reports 16(10), 488.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Vallurupalli, M, Lauderdale, K, Balboni, MJ, et al. (2012) The role of spirituality and religious coping in the quality of life of patients with advanced cancer receiving palliative radiation therapy. Journal of Supportive Oncology 10(2), 8187.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
van der Spek, N, Vos, J, van Uden-Kraan, CF, et al. (2013) Meaning making in cancer survivors: A focus group study. PloS One 8(9), e76089.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Visser, A, Garssen, B, and Vingerhoets, A (2010) Spirituality and well-being in cancer patients: A review. Psycho-Oncology 19(6), 565572.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Vodermaier, A and Millman, RD (2011) Accuracy of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale as a screening tool in cancer patients: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Supportive Care in Cancer 19(12), 18991908.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Wilson, KG, Chochinov, HM, Skirko, MG, et al. (2007) Depression and anxiety disorders in palliative cancer care. Journal of Pain and Symptom Management 33(2), 118129.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Zigmond, AS and Snaith, RP (1983) The hospital anxiety and depression scale. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica 67(6), 361370.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
3
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Mediating effect of interpersonal coping on meaning in spirituality and quality of life and the influences of depression and anxiety thereon in cancer patients
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Mediating effect of interpersonal coping on meaning in spirituality and quality of life and the influences of depression and anxiety thereon in cancer patients
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Mediating effect of interpersonal coping on meaning in spirituality and quality of life and the influences of depression and anxiety thereon in cancer patients
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *