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The ethics of space, design and color in an oncology ward

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 August 2012

Elisabeth Andritsch
Affiliation:
Clinical Division of Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Medical University Graz, Graz, Austria
Herbert Stöger
Affiliation:
Clinical Division of Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Medical University Graz, Graz, Austria
Thomas Bauernhofer
Affiliation:
Clinical Division of Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Medical University Graz, Graz, Austria
Hans Andritsch
Affiliation:
Division for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Landesnervenklinik Sigmund Freud Graz, Graz, Austria
Anne-Katrin Kasparek
Affiliation:
Clinical Division of Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Medical University Graz, Graz, Austria
Renate Schaberl-Moser
Affiliation:
Clinical Division of Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Medical University Graz, Graz, Austria
Ferdinand Ploner
Affiliation:
Clinical Division of Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Medical University Graz, Graz, Austria
Hellmut Samonigg
Affiliation:
Clinical Division of Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Medical University Graz, Graz, Austria
Corresponding

Abstract

Change affects all areas of healthcare organizations and none more so than each aspect of the oncology ward, beginning with the patient's room. It is there that the issues faced by the major players in healing environments – administrator, caregiver, family member, and, most importantly, the patient – come sharply into focus. Hospitals are building new facilities or renovating old ones in order to adapt to new environmental demands of patient care and security. Driven by ethical and professional responsibility, the oncological team headed by Professor Hellmut Samonigg of Graz Medical University Graz pursued a vision of designing a model oncology ward unique in Europe. Friedensreich Hundertwasser, the world-famous artist, was the creative force behind the design. The oncology ward became a place of healing, permeated with a colorful sense of life and harmonious holistic care. The successful outcome was confirmed by the extraordinarily positive feedback by patients, families, and healthcare staff.

Type
Review Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2012 

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