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Thin Film Coil Design Considerations for Wireless Power Transfer in Flat Panel Display

  • Jun Yu (a1), Kai Ying (a1), David Hasko (a1), Sungsik Lee (a1), Arman Ahnood (a1), W. I. Milne (a1) and Arokia Nathan (a1)...

Abstract

Wireless power transfer is experimentally demonstrated by transmission between an AC power transmitter and receiver, both realised using thin film technology. The transmitter and receiver thin film coils are chosen to be identical in order to promote resonant coupling. Planar spiral coils are used because of the ease of fabrication and to reduce the metal layer thickness. The energy transfer efficiency as a function of transfer distance is analysed along with a comparison between the theoretical and the experimental results.

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[1] Tesla, Nikola, U.S.patent 1,119,732 (1914).
[2] Soljacic, M, Kurs, A., and Karalis, A, “Wireless Power Transfer via Strongly Coupled Magnetic Resonances,” J. Sciencexpress, 2007, 112(6): 110.
[3] Cannon, B.L., Hoburg, J.F, and Stancil, D.D, Goldstein, S.C, “Magnetic Resonance Coupling As a Potential Means for Wireless Power Transfer to Multiple Small Receivers,” IEEE Trans. Circuit Syst. Vol. 57, No.7 July 2009.
[4] Sample, A.P, Meyer, D A, and Smith, J.R, “Analysis, Experimental Results, and Range Adaptation of Magnetically Coupled Resonators for Wireless Power Transfer,” IEEE Transactions on Industrial Electronics, Vol. 58, No.2, February 2011.

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Thin Film Coil Design Considerations for Wireless Power Transfer in Flat Panel Display

  • Jun Yu (a1), Kai Ying (a1), David Hasko (a1), Sungsik Lee (a1), Arman Ahnood (a1), W. I. Milne (a1) and Arokia Nathan (a1)...

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