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Semiconductor Nanostructures defined by self-organizing Polymers

  • Michael Haupt (a1), Stephan Miller (a1), Andreas Ladenburger (a1), Rolf Sauer (a1), Klaus Thonke (a1), Silke Riethmueller (a2), Martin Moeller (a2) and Florian Banhart (a3)...

Abstract

In the near future it will be more and more important to produce real nanometer-sized structures for semiconductor devices (e.g., quantum dot lasers) but also for nano-biomechanical applications like the so-called total analysis system implemented on one chip.

We describe here a technique to create nanometer-sized structures in semiconductors and metals by the use of self-assembling diblock copolymers as nano-lithographic masks. Semiconductor quantum structures with very high aspect ratio of 1:10 were fabricated from III-V semiconductor heterostructures by anisotropic dry etching. In a first step, so-called diblock copolymer micelles were generated in a toluene solution. These micelles were loaded by a noblemetal salt. With a “Langmuir Blodgett” technique we can decorate complete wafers with a monolayer of highly ordered micelles, covering almost the complete surface. After treatment in a hydrogen plasma all of the organic components are removed and only crystalline metal clusters of ~12 nm size remain. This metal cluster mask can be used directly in a highly anisotropic chlorine dry etching process to etch cylinders in GaAs and its In and Al alloys. It is also possible to etch through a quantum well layer underneath the surface in order to produce quantum dots.

By evaporating metals and applying a wet chemical image reversal process, we can invert the etched structure and generate a gauzy gold film with nano-holes inside. It is thinkable to use this porous gold film as a nano-filter in upcoming nano-biotechnology applications.

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Semiconductor Nanostructures defined by self-organizing Polymers

  • Michael Haupt (a1), Stephan Miller (a1), Andreas Ladenburger (a1), Rolf Sauer (a1), Klaus Thonke (a1), Silke Riethmueller (a2), Martin Moeller (a2) and Florian Banhart (a3)...

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