Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

MATERIALS, DESIGN, AND INNOVATION IN NONMAJORS SCIENCE EDUCATION

  • Jonathan B. Puthoff (a1), Anne K. Bentley (a2), Kellar Autumn (a1) and Julio DePaula (a2)

Abstract

In-depth materials science course offerings are crucial for training the next generation of researchers in many pure and applied fields. However, translating discoveries from the laboratory into domestic and industrial settings requires contributions from professionals outside of these strictly technical areas. Providing non-major students instruction in core scientific ideas and illustrating the myriad pathways by which these ideas become innovative technologies should be an additional goal of science and engineering programs. “Technologies of the Future” (ToF) is a novel course for non-science/engineering majors in which students participate in team-based laboratory and design projects with modern materials systems. After learning about a phenomenon or physical principle in class, students are given the opportunity to explore it in lab and are tasked with the design of a novel device that incorporates it. Example laboratory topics include superhydrophobic surfaces and dye-sensitized solar cells. In the design phase, instructors act as “consultants”, lending their expertise to students unfamiliar with engineering analysis or ancillary physical concepts. Summative activities are designed to leverage the diverse talents of the interdisciplinary teams of students. The course concepts and activities are designed to prepare students for both a modern workplace that requires innovative thinking and a modern world in which emerging technologies offer solutions to pressing environmental and social problems.

Copyright

References

Hide All
1. Moskovitz, C. and Kellogg, D., Science 332, 919920 (2011).
2. DeHaan, R., J. Sci. Educ. Technol. 14, 253269 (2005).
3. Jackson, D.P., Laws, P.W., and Franklin, S.V., Science 335, 418419 (2012).
4. Yen, J. and Weissburg, M., Bioinsp. Biomim. 2, E01 (2007).
5. Bathlott, W. and Neinhuis, C., Planta 202, 18 (1997).
6. Autumn, K., American Scientist 94, 124132 (2006).
7. Johnson, S., Where Good Ideas Come From (Riverhead Books, New York, NY, USA), 2010.
8. Baz, A., Iman, K., and Mccoy, J., J. Intell. Mater. Syst. Struct. 1, 105133 (1990).
9. Smestad, G.P. and Grätzel, M., J. Chem. Educ. 75, 752756 (1998).
10. Bentley, A.K., et al. ., J. Chem. Educ. 82, 765768 (2005).
11. NOVA | Making Stuff.http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/tech/making-stuff.html (accessed Mar. 2013).

Keywords

Related content

Powered by UNSILO

MATERIALS, DESIGN, AND INNOVATION IN NONMAJORS SCIENCE EDUCATION

  • Jonathan B. Puthoff (a1), Anne K. Bentley (a2), Kellar Autumn (a1) and Julio DePaula (a2)

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed.