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High Glass Transition TemperatÜRe Electro-Optic Polymers

  • Chengjiu Wu (a1), Karl Beeson (a1), Paul Ferm (a1), Charles Knapp (a1), Michael J. Mcfarland (a1), Ajay Nahata (a1), Jianhui Shan (a1) and James T. Yardley (a1)...

Abstract

Disperse Red-1 type chromophores were attached to the backbones of PMMA, polyvinyl-phenol as well as the styrene-Maleimide alternative copolymer and glass transition temperatures of these three polymer derivatives were in the range of 125, 165, and 245°C, respectively. We have also, for the first time, attached EO chromophores to some thermostable cardo-polymers. Fluorene derivatives in which the 2- and 7-positions were substituted with an electron accepting and an electron donating substitutem, respectively, were made polymerizable through their reactive functional groups at the 9,9′-positions. Various condensation polymers were prepared. These polymers are amorphous, film-forming, thermostable, and having Tg ranging from 150 to 300°C. These polymers exhibit strong electro-optic properties after electrode poling. Thermal stabilities of these polymers were compared by following the spectral decay of the chromophore and the decay of the electro-optic coefficient. The loss of EO activity at elevated temperature can be realized as a combination of chromophore reorientation and chemical degradation.

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References

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1. Singer, K.D., Sohn, J.E., King, L. A., Gordon, H.M., Karz, H.E., and Dirk, C.W., JOSA, B 6, 1339 (1989).
2. Nahata, A., Shan, J., Yardley, J.T., and Wu, C., JOSA B, to be published.
3. Nahata, A., Shan, J., Yardley, J.T., and Wu, C., JOSA B 10, 1554 (1993).
4. See for example Lytel, R., Lipscomb, G.F., Binkley, E.S., Kenny, J.T., and Ticknor, A.J., Materials for Nonlinear Optics: Chemical Perspectives (ACS, 1991), Chapter 6, p. 106.
5. See for example Lampsch, H.L., Yang, J., Wong, G.K., and Torkelson, J.M., Polymer Comm., 30, 40 (1989);
Singer, K.D. and King, L.A., J. Appl. Phys., 70, 3251 (1991);
Man, H.-T. and Yoon, H. N., Adv. Mater. 4, 159 (1992);
Lindsay, G.A., Henry, R.A., Hoover, J.M., Knoesen, A., and Mortazavi, M.A., Macromolecules, 25, 4884 (1992).
6. Polyvinylphenol kindly provided by Hoechst Celanese Inc.
7. Osuch, C.E., Brahim, K., Hopf, F.R., McFarland, M.J., Mooring, A., and Wu, C., Proc. SPIE, 631, 68 (1986).
8. Karshak, V.V., Vinogradova, S.V., and Vygodskii, Y.S., J. Macromol. Sci. Rev. Macromol. Chem., C11, 45 (1974).
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10. Jonker, S.A. and Warman, J.W., ACS Polymer Reprints 32–3, 142 (1991).
11. Nahata, A., Wu, C., and Yardley, J.T., IEEE Trans, on Instrumentation and Measurement, 41, 128 (1992).
12. The number M =2.5 indicates that the polymer contained equal amounts of diacid where M=2 andm=3.
13. The chromophore (2-dimethylamino-7-nitrofluorene) is approximately 48wt% in the BPE-2.5 as compared to the 31 wt% of Disperse red-1 in the corresponding MAI.

High Glass Transition TemperatÜRe Electro-Optic Polymers

  • Chengjiu Wu (a1), Karl Beeson (a1), Paul Ferm (a1), Charles Knapp (a1), Michael J. Mcfarland (a1), Ajay Nahata (a1), Jianhui Shan (a1) and James T. Yardley (a1)...

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