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The Use of Surrogates in Waste Immobilization Studies: A Case Study of Plutonium

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Paul A. Bingham
Affiliation:
Immobilization Science Laboratory, Department of Engineering Materials, University of Sheffield, Sir Robert Hadfield Building, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD, UK.
Russell J. Hand
Affiliation:
Immobilization Science Laboratory, Department of Engineering Materials, University of Sheffield, Sir Robert Hadfield Building, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD, UK.
Martin C. Stennett
Affiliation:
Immobilization Science Laboratory, Department of Engineering Materials, University of Sheffield, Sir Robert Hadfield Building, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD, UK.
Neil C. Hyatt
Affiliation:
Immobilization Science Laboratory, Department of Engineering Materials, University of Sheffield, Sir Robert Hadfield Building, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD, UK.
Mike T. Harrison
Affiliation:
Materials and Products, Nexia Solutions Ltd, The Technology Centre, Sellafield, Seascale CA20 1PG, UK.
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Abstract

Surrogates are widely used in the research and development of nuclear wasteforms, providing detailed insight into the chemical and physical behaviour of the wasteform whilst avoiding the widespread (restricted and costly) use of radiotoxic elements in the laboratory. However, caution must be exercised when dealing with surrogates since no single element or compound perfectly mimics all aspects of the behaviour of another. In this paper we present a broad discussion of the use of surrogates in waste immobilization, drawing upon and highlighting our research into glass and ceramic wasteforms for the immobilization of bulk PuO2.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2008

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