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Transistors Built With ZrO2 And HfO2 Deposited From Nitratos

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 March 2011


Stephen A. Campbell
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical Engineering, Deptartment of Chemistry, University of Minnesota, 200 Union Street, 207 Pleasant Avenue Minneapolis, MN. 55455, USA
Noel Hoilien
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical Engineering, Deptartment of Chemistry, University of Minnesota, 200 Union Street, 207 Pleasant Avenue Minneapolis, MN. 55455, USA
Tiezhong Ma
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical Engineering, Deptartment of Chemistry, University of Minnesota, 200 Union Street, 207 Pleasant Avenue Minneapolis, MN. 55455, USA
Fang Chen
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical Engineering, Deptartment of Chemistry, University of Minnesota, 200 Union Street, 207 Pleasant Avenue Minneapolis, MN. 55455, USA
Ryan Smith
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical Engineering, Deptartment of Chemistry, University of Minnesota, 200 Union Street, 207 Pleasant Avenue Minneapolis, MN. 55455, USA
Wayne Gladfelter
Affiliation:
Deptartment of Chemistry, University of Minnesota, 200 Union Street, 207 Pleasant Avenue Minneapolis, MN. 55455, USA

Abstract

The electrical performance of transistors built using thin films of the column IVB metal oxides ZrO2 and HfO2 deposited from their respective anhydrous metal nitrate precursors is presented. In contrast to earlier work on TiO2, which is thermodynamically unstable on silicon, ZrO2 and HfO2 form well-defined oxynitride interfacial layers and have a good interface with silicon with much less fixed charge. The inversion layer mobility for an HfO2 / SiOxNy / Si stack is comparable to that of a conventional SiOxNy/Si interface.


Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2001

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