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Thermal Growth of He-cavities in Si Studied by Cascade Implantation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

E. Ntsoenzok
Affiliation:
CNRS/CERI, 3A rue de la Ferollerie 45071 Orléans, France
R. El Bouayadi
Affiliation:
TECSEN, case 151, Faculte des Sciences ST-Jerome, 13397 MARSEILLE, France
G. Regula
Affiliation:
TECSEN, case 151, Faculte des Sciences ST-Jerome, 13397 MARSEILLE, France
B. Pichaud
Affiliation:
TECSEN, case 151, Faculte des Sciences ST-Jerome, 13397 MARSEILLE, France
S. Ashok
Affiliation:
Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, the Pennsylvania State University, 212 Earth and Engineering Science Building, University Park, PA 16802, USA
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Abstract

Float Zone (FZ) silicon samples have been cascade-implanted with helium ions at energies decreasing from 1.9 MeV to 0.8 MeV in steps of 0.1 MeV, with flux maintained between 5 × 1012 and 1 × 1013 He cm-2-1s. The dose was 5×1016 He cm-2 for all the energies except 0.8 MeV where a lower dose of 3×1016 He cm-2 was used. After thermal annealing, the sample was studied by cross section transmission electron microscopy (XTEM) using a Field Emission Gun Microscope (Jeol 2010F). Our results clearly demonstrate that these cavities mainly grow by the Ostwald ripening mechanism. This means a growth by exchange of He and vacancies from smaller to bigger cavities. Further this study provides essential data for resolving the controversy on the growth mechanism governing He-cavities.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2005

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References

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Thermal Growth of He-cavities in Si Studied by Cascade Implantation
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