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Synthesis of Thin Film Battery Components by the Spray Decomposition Technique

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 February 2011


K.S. Weil
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213
P.N. Kumta
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213
J. D. Harris
Affiliation:
School of Technology, Kent State University, Kent, OH 44242
A. F. Hepp
Affiliation:
Photovoltaics and Space Environment Branch, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, John H. Glenn Research Center, Lewis Field, Cleveland, OH 44135

Abstract

Thin film LiCoO2 anodes and SnO2 cathodes on the order of 1-10 µtm thick have been synthesized using a spray decomposition technique, employing a lithium-nickel nitrate/methanol solution and tin ethylhexanoate/methanol solution, respectively. Preliminary electrochemical test results on the films indicate that the LiCoO2 anodes in general display a relatively high open circuit voltage (OCV) of ∼4.10-4.25V, good specific capacity on the order of 120 mAh/g, and acceptable cycle-ability, with a 16-25% decay in operating voltage after 50 cycles. The SnO2 films display excellent performance characteristics, upon an expected initial drop in capacity, with an OCV of 1.00-1.10V, specific capacity of ∼600 mAh/g, and virtually no decay in operating voltage after 50 cycles. The solid-state electrolyte, lithium phosphate, was prepared in thin film form by a similar spray processing technique. Additionally, it has been demonstrated that spray decomposition can be used to sequentially deposit the anode, electrolyte, and cathode film layers to form a layered thin film battery (TFB), although electrochemical testing of this thin film device has not yet been conducted.


Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1999

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