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Synthesis and Electrical Characterization of Tin Oxide Nanostructures

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

Olivia Maria Berengue
Affiliation:
oliberengue@yahoo.com.brolimb@df.ufscar.br, Federal University of São Carlos, Nanolab, Department of Physics, São Carlos, Brazil
Cleocir J. Dalmaschio
Affiliation:
Dalmaschio@fakemail.com, Federal University of São Carlos, LIEC, Department of Chemistry, Brazil, Brazil
Tiago G. Conti
Affiliation:
Tiago_conti@fakemail.com, Federal University of São Carlos, LIEC, Department of Chemistry, Brazil, Brazil
Adenilson J. Chiquito
Affiliation:
Adenilson@fakemail.com, Federal University of São Carlos, Nanolab, Department of Physics, São Carlos, Brazil
Edson R. Leite
Affiliation:
Leite@fakemail.com, Federal University of São Carlos, LIEC, Department of Chemistry, Brazil, Brazil
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Abstract

Sn3O4 nanobelts were grown by a carbothermal evaporation process of SnO2 powders in association with the well known vapour-solid mechanism (VS). The nanobelts crystal structure was investigated by x-ray diffraction (XRD), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), raman spectroscopy and field emission gun scanning electron microscopy (FEG-SEM). The structural and morphological characterization has confirmed the growth of single crystal nanobelts. The electrical characterization (current-voltage, temperature-dependent resistance curves) of individual Sn3O4 nanobelts was performed at different temperatures and light excitation. The experiments revealed a semiconductor – like character as evidenced by the resistance decreasing at high temperatures. The transport mechanism was identified as the variable range hopping.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2009

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References

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