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Structure of Nanocomposite films of CdS nanoparticles in a polymer matrix

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Tiziana Di Luccio
Affiliation:
UTS MAT, ENEA Centro Ricerche Brindisi, Brindisi, Italy Department für Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, München, Germany
Bert Nickel
Affiliation:
Department für Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, München, Germany
Francesco Antolini
Affiliation:
UTS MAT, ENEA Centro Ricerche Brindisi, Brindisi, Italy
Marzia Pentimalli
Affiliation:
UTS MAT, ENEA Centro Ricerche Brindisi, Brindisi, Italy
Leander Tapfer
Affiliation:
UTS MAT, ENEA Centro Ricerche Brindisi, Brindisi, Italy
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Abstract

A thiolate precursor was dispersed in a polymer solution and a precursor/polymer film was obtained by casting. Thermal annealing of the precursor/polymer film leads to the formation of a nanocomposite of nanometer-sized CdS dispersed in the polymer (thermolytic process). Different polymers were used as matrix material; in particular we employed a cyclo-olefin copolymer for its good optical properties and extremely low water absorption. After annealing with a temperature between 230 and 250°C in vacuum (pressure of about 6×10−3 mbar) the CdS nanoparticles are found to be crystalline with a diameter of about 2nm in size. The nanoparticle size can be increased up to 15nm by annealing at higher temperatures (300°C). The details of the structural properties of the nanocomposite films have been investigated by small and wide angle x-ray scattering (SAXS and WAXS, respectively). A simple dependence of the nanoparticle dimensions on the annealing temperature was found. Furthermore, SAXS measurements indicate that the separation between the nanoparticles compares with their diameter.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2005

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