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Semiorganics: A New Class of Nlo Materials

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 February 2011

P. R. Newman
Affiliation:
Rockwell International Science Center, Thousand Oaks, CA 91360
L. F. Warren
Affiliation:
Rockwell International Science Center, Thousand Oaks, CA 91360
P. Cunningham
Affiliation:
Rockwell International Science Center, Thousand Oaks, CA 91360
T. Y. Chang
Affiliation:
Rockwell International Science Center, Thousand Oaks, CA 91360
D. E. Cooper
Affiliation:
Rockwell International Science Center, Thousand Oaks, CA 91360
G. L. Burdge
Affiliation:
Laboratory for Physical Sciences, College Park, MD 20740
P. Polak-Dingels
Affiliation:
Laboratory for Physical Sciences, College Park, MD 20740
C. K. Lowe-Ma
Affiliation:
Naval Weapons Center, China Lake, CA 93555
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Recent results indicate that certain organic molecules whose electronic structures are characterized by extended pi-molecular orbitals can exhibit significant second and third order nonlinear optical (NLO) effects [1]. Unfortunately, this same arrangement which leads to the NLO effects, can also result in essentially one-dimensional bonding coordination. This in turn means that crystals grown from these materials do not readily form good three-dimensional optical-quality crystals, but rather tend to form needles. In addition, pure organic crystals are usually bonded by weak van der Waals forces, often resulting in poor mechanical properties. Indeed, organic impurities are frequently incorporated into these systems during crystallization resulting in poor crystallinity, spurious absorptions, and low damage thresholds. This is particularly true in the case of polymeric NLO materials, where impurities result from the polymerization steps and/or starting materials.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1990

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References

[1] Williams, D.J., ed., Nonlinear Optical Properties of OrRanic and Polymeric Materials, ACS Symp. Ser. 233, Am. Chem. Soc., Washington, D.C., 1983.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
[2] Eimerl, D., Velsko, S., Davis, L., Wang, F., Loiacono, G., and Kennedy, G., IEEE J. Quantum Elec. 25, 179 (1989).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
[3] Bedeaux, D. and Bloembergen, N., Physica 69, 57 (1973).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
[4] Andreeti, G.D., Cavalca, L., and Musatti, A., Acta Cryst. B24, 683 (1968).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
[5] Chang, T.Y., Ewbank, M.D., Vazquez, R.A., Warren, L.F., and Newman, P.R., presented at the 1989 Opt. Soc. Am. Fall Meeting, Orlando, FL, Oct. 16, 1985.Google Scholar

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