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Resistance to cracking of a stretchable semiconductor: Speed of crack propagation for varying energy release rate

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Sheng Liu
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, NJIT, Newark, NJ 07102
Hee C. Lim
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, NJIT, Newark, NJ 07102
Min Qu
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, NJIT, Newark, NJ 07102
John F. Federici
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, NJIT, Newark, NJ 07102
Gordon A. Thomas
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, NJIT, Newark, NJ 07102
Helena Gleskova
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ
Sigurd Wagner
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ
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Abstract

We have measured and calculated the propagation velocity of successive cracks in a single sample of amorphous SiNx as a function of energy release rate. We have obtained the conditions for controlled, repetitive crack formation by using a substrate of compliant plastic that survives the cracking of a thin film formed on it. We have recorded the crack velocity curves using high-speed micro-photography using dark field illumination. Under uniform, uniaxial tensile strain, the films crack in an array of essentially straight, parallel lines, if the increase of the strain density is slow. We find reasonable agreement in the comparison of theory and experiment and find a linear relationship between the initial velocity and energy release rate threshold. Consequently, in cases where the theoretical agreement with the data is reasonable, the successive cracks show velocity curves that scale with each other.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2004

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References

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