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Processing-Microstructure-Tensile Property of Vapor Grown Carbon Fiber Reinforced Carbon Composite

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 February 2011


Jyh-Ming Ting
Affiliation:
Applied Sciences, Inc., 141 West Xenia Avenue, Cedarville, OH 45314

Abstract

In contrast to the form in which other carbon fibers are produced, vapor grown carbon fiber (VGCF) is produced from gas phase precursors in the form of individual fibers of discrete lengths. VGCF can be harvested as a mat of semi-aligned, semicontinuous fibers, with occasional fiber branching and curling. The use of VGCF mats as reinforcement result in composites which exhibit unique microstructure and physical properties that are not observed in other types of carbon composites. This paper describes the processing of VGCF mats reinforced carbon composites, and its unique microstructure and properties. Utilization of fiber tensile properties, as well as thermal conductivity, in the composites is discussed. Comparison of experimental results from various VGCF composites to theory indicates that mechanical properties are more strongly affected by characteristics of VGCF mat than are thermal conductivity. The implications of this relationship favors applications for thermal management where structural demands are less stringent.


Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1995

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