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Preparation Of Single-Phase Knbo3, Using Bimetallc Alkoxides

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 February 2011

Mostafa M. Amini
Affiliation:
Ceramics Division, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611
Michael D. Sacks
Affiliation:
Ceramics Division, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611
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Abstract

Single-phase KNbO3 was prepared using bimetallic alkoxides. Potassium-niobium ethoxide, KNb(OC2H5)6, and potassium-niobium propoxide, KNb(OC3H7)6, were synthesized and subsequently hydrolyzed using several water concentrations. Potassium-deficient particles were rapidly precipitated when higher water concentrations were used and this resulted in the formation of a multiphase material after calcination. In contrast, single-phase KNbO3 powders could be prepared by two methods: (1) hydrolysis of KNb(OC3H7)6/propanol solutions using 1 mole water (per mole of propoxide) added as a water/propanol solution and (2) hydrolysis of KNb(OC2H5)6,/ethanol solutions using 1 mole of water (per mole of ethoxide) added as a water/methanol solution. The latter method was also used to form thin films of KNbO3.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1990

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