Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-77ffc5d9c7-kttml Total loading time: 2.428 Render date: 2021-04-23T12:39:45.521Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Preparation of BaTiO3 and PbTiO3 thin Films on BaPb3 Substrates by the SOL-GEL Method and Their Properties

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 February 2011

M. KuWabAra
Affiliation:
Kyushu Institute of Technology, Department of Applied Chemistry, Tobata, Kitakyushu 804, Japan
T. Kuroda
Affiliation:
Kyushu Institute of Technology, Department of Applied Chemistry, Tobata, Kitakyushu 804, Japan
S. Takahashi
Affiliation:
Kyushu Institute of Technology, Department of Applied Chemistry, Tobata, Kitakyushu 804, Japan
T. Azuma
Affiliation:
Kyushu Institute of Technology, Department of Applied Chemistry, Tobata, Kitakyushu 804, Japan
Get access

Abstract

Barium titanate, lead titanate and barium-lead titanate thin films were prepared by the sol-gel method using metal alkoxides on metallic conducting BaPbO3 ceramic substrates. Thin films were deposited on the polished surfaces of the substrates by spin coating solutions containing Ba(OC2H4OCH3)2, Pb(OCOCH3)2 and Ti(O-iC3H7)4 and methoxyethanol. The gel films were then fired at appropriate temperatures to yield ceramic thin films. A 0.50 µm-thick BaTio3 film showed a dielectric constant of 280 and tan ° of 3% at 1kHz with no distinguishable peak of dielectric constant at any temperature between 20°C and 200°C. Both PbTiO3 (0.75 µm thick) and Ba0.7Pb0.3 (0.2 µm thick) films, on the other hand, showed a distinguishable peak of dielectric constant at their Curie point with a rather deformed P-E hysteresis loop at room temperature.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1992

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

1. Dharmadhikari, V. S. and Grannemann, W. W., J. Appl. Phys., 53, 8988 (1982).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2. Fukushima, J., Kodaira, K., and Matsushita, T., Am. Ceram. Soc. Bull., 55, 1064 (1976).Google Scholar
3. Campion, J. F., Payne, D. A., Chae, H. K., and Xu, Z. in Ceramic Powder Science IV: Ceram. Trans 22., edited by Hirano, S., Messing, G. L., and Hausner, H. (Am. Ceram. Soc., Ohio, 1991) pp. 477489.Google Scholar
4. Tuchiya, T., Kawano, T., Sei, T., and Hatano, J., J. Ceram. Soc. Jpn., 98, 743 (1990) in Japanese.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
5. Blum, J. B. and Gurkovich, S. R., J. Mater. Sci., 20, 4479 (1985).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
6. Budd, K. D., Dey, S.K., and Payne, D.A. in Better Ceramics Through Chemistry II. edited by Brinker, C.J., Clark, D.E., and Ulrich, D.R. (Mater. Res. Soc. Proc. 73, Pittsburgh, PA, 1986) pp. 711716.Google Scholar
7. Fukushima, J., Kodaira, K., and Matsushita, T., J. Mater. Sci., 19, 595 (1984).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
8. Dey, S. K., Budd, K. D., and Payne, D. A., IEEE Trans. Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics, and Frequency Control, 35, 80 (1988).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
9. Ramamurthi, S. D. and Payne, D. A., J. Am. Ceram. Soc., 73, 2547 (1990).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
10. Jaffe, B., Cook, W. R. Jr, and Jaffe, H., Piezoelectric Ceramics, (Academic Press, London, 1971), p. 94.Google Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 7 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 23rd April 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Preparation of BaTiO3 and PbTiO3 thin Films on BaPb3 Substrates by the SOL-GEL Method and Their Properties
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Preparation of BaTiO3 and PbTiO3 thin Films on BaPb3 Substrates by the SOL-GEL Method and Their Properties
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Preparation of BaTiO3 and PbTiO3 thin Films on BaPb3 Substrates by the SOL-GEL Method and Their Properties
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *