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Polymer Liquid Crystals and Their Blends: A Hierarchy of Structures

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 February 2011

Witold Brostow
Affiliation:
Center for Materials Characterization and Department of Chemistry, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203-5308
Michael Hess
Affiliation:
Center for Materials Characterization and Department of Chemistry, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203-5308 FB6- Physikalische Chemie, Universität Duisburg, D-W-4100 Duisburg, Federal Republic of Germany
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Abstract

Hierarchical structures are possible in polymer liquid crystals (PLCs) since each molecule contains at least two kinds of building blocks that are not homeomorphic to each other. We discuss some examples of molecular structures and phase structures of monomer liquid crystals (MLCs) and PLCs: smectic phases formed by interdigitated MLC molecules; PLC molecule classification based on increasing complexity – and its consequences on properties of the materials; and formation and phase structures of LC-rich islands in PLCs and in PLC blends. Some rules pertaining to hierarchical structures are formulated. The knowledge of hierarchies is neccessary – but not sufficient – for intelligent procesing of PLCs and their blends and for achieving properties defined in advance. Computer modelling represents another important element of building materials to order.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1992

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