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A Novel Room Temperature Infrared Detector Using Micro-Compensated Amorphous Silicon

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 February 2011

D. Caputo
Affiliation:
Department of Electronic Engineering, University of Rome “La Sapienza”, via Eudossiana 18, 00184 Rome, (Italy)
G. De Cesare
Affiliation:
Department of Electronic Engineering, University of Rome “La Sapienza”, via Eudossiana 18, 00184 Rome, (Italy)
A. Nascetti
Affiliation:
Department of Electronic Engineering, University of Rome “La Sapienza”, via Eudossiana 18, 00184 Rome, (Italy)
F. Palma
Affiliation:
Department of Electronic Engineering, University of Rome “La Sapienza”, via Eudossiana 18, 00184 Rome, (Italy)
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Abstract

Detection at room temperature of near and medium infrared radiation has been achieved by using micro-doped or micro-compensated amorphous silicon films as intermediate absorber layer in a p-n junction. Extremely low dopant concentrations in the gas mixture have been utilized to achieve micro-doping and micro-compensation. Device operation is based on transitions, induced by the infrared radiation, between extended states in the valence band and defects in the forbidden gap. The absorption process changes electron defect occupancy, giving rise to change in electric field distribution. This effect can be observed as variation of differential capacitance of the structure. Capacitance measurements, performed on two different devices with micro-doped and micro-compensated absorber layer respectively, showed sensitivity to radiation from 900 nm up to 4·5 jim.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1998

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References

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