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Nanoscale 3D Chemical Mapping by Spectroscopic Electron Tomography

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 February 2011

Günter Möbus
Affiliation:
Dept of Engineering Materials, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD, UK Dept of Materials, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PH, UK
Ron C. Doole
Affiliation:
Dept of Materials, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PH, UK
Beverley J. Inkson
Affiliation:
Dept of Engineering Materials, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD, UK Dept of Materials, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PH, UK
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Abstract

Electron Tomography is shown to be applicable to problems of materials science if a contrast mechanism is used which provides a projection relationship for crystals not depending on lattice plane orientation. Energy filtered TEM (EFTEM) in its mode of electron spectroscopic imaging (ESI) and STEM-EDX-Mapping are, subject to limitations, suitable image formation techniques. The spectroscopic operation not only allows to overcome Bragg scattering artefacts, but offers the possibility of recording 4-dimensional data (volume and energy) of a region of interest, otherwise only known from NMR and XAS/XANES tomography at larger length-scales and from field-ion microscopy (atom probe) under restrictive conditions.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2003

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