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Nanoindentation Hardness of 17–4PH Stainless Steel Irradiated With 2.5 MEV PER Nucleon 20NE2+ Ions

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 February 2011

D. S. Grummon
Affiliation:
Dept of Metallurgy, Mechanics and Materials Science, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824.
R. Schalek
Affiliation:
Dept of Metallurgy, Mechanics and Materials Science, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824.
T. Rachel
Affiliation:
Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824.
H. Schock
Affiliation:
Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824.
R. M. Ronningen
Affiliation:
Ntional Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824.
Wm. C. Mcharris
Affiliation:
Ntional Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824.
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Abstract

Direct ion implantation of radioactive isotopes, such as 7Be or 22Na, has recently been of interest as a means of surface layer activation for purposes of wear-rate measurement in material systems for which activation by conventional proton irradiation is ineffective. Though direct implantation doses anticipated for adequate wear measurement sensitivity are expected to be quite low (∼1012 cm−2), the potential for alteration of wear properties by ion damage cannot be ignored. The present work was designed to simulate 22Na implantation with non-radioactive 20Ne irradiations into specimens of 17–4PH stainless steel which had been deliberately heat treated to contain 98 vol% metastable martensite. Specimens were subjected to doses of 2×1012, 2×1013 and 2×1014 cm−2 of 20Ne2+, applied at a total energy of 50 MeV, giving a projected ion range (determined by TRIM-91 computations) of approximately 10 μm. Nanoindentation surface hardness traverses were conducted to detect any material softening which may have resulted from ion-solid interactions within the projected range. Though doses of > 1014 cm−2 produced a detectable softening (apparent as a dip in the hardness level corresponding to locations near the end of the ion range) the maximum dose for a negligible effect on nanoindentation hardness was found to be approximately 1013 cm−2, well above the doses anticipated for use in wear studies employing direct ion implantation of radioisotopes.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1992

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Nanoindentation Hardness of 17–4PH Stainless Steel Irradiated With 2.5 MEV PER Nucleon 20NE2+ Ions
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