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Multifunctional Molecular and Polymeric Materials for Nonlinear Optics and Photonics

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 February 2011

Paras N. Prasad
Affiliation:
Photonics Research Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14214
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Molecular units in natural systems are multifunctional in that they exhibit more than one functionalities. This is nature's way of economizing and being efficient. For many technological applications, there is a need for synthetic multifunctional materials which simultaneously exhibit many necessary physical and chemical properties. By appropriate modification of structures both at the molecular and bulk levels, one can incorporate such multifunctionality in molecular and polymeric systems. Our research program focuses on investigations of multifunctional materials for applications in photonics. Photonics describes the emerging new technology in which a photon instead of an electron is used to acquire, process, store and transmit information.

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Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1990

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References

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