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Molecular Probes of Physical and Chemical Properties of Sol-Gel Films

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 February 2011

J. I. Zink
Affiliation:
Dept. of Chemistry, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095, zink@chem.ucla.edu
B. Dunn
Affiliation:
Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095
B. Dave
Affiliation:
Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095
F. Akbarian
Affiliation:
Dept. of Chemistry, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095, zink@chem.ucla.edu
Corresponding
E-mail address:
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Abstract

Two molecular probes, pyranine (8-hydroxy 1,3,6-trisulfonated pyrene) and cytochrome c, are used to probe two different aspects of sol-gel SiO2 films. Pyranine is used as an in-situ fluorescence probe to monitor the chemical evolution during sol-gel thin film deposition of silica by the dip coating process. The sensitivity of pyranine luminescence to protonation/deprotonation effects is used to quantify changes in the water/alcohol ratio in real time as the substrate is withdrawn from the sol reservoir. Correlation of the luminescence results with the interference pattern of the depositing film allows the solvent composition to be mapped as a function of film thickness. Cytochrome c is used as a probe of the rotational mobility of a large molecule in the pores of sol-gel SiO2 films. A.C. dipolar relaxation measurements show that the biomolecule remains mobile but experiences a ten-fold increase in local microviscosity.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1996

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