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Mimicking the Nature to Achieve Superhydrophobic Surfaces by Vapor Phase Deposition

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Sushant Gupta
Affiliation:
sushant3@ufl.edu, University of Florida, Materials Science & Engineering, 100 Rhines Hall, Dr. Singh Group, Gainesville, FL, 32611, United States, (352)846-2496
Arul Arjunan Chakkaravarthi
Affiliation:
arul@sinmat.com, University of Florida, Materials Science & Engineering, 100 Rhines Hall, Gainesville, FL, 32611, United States
Rajiv Singh
Affiliation:
rsing@mse.ufl.edu, University of Florida, Materials Science & Engineering, 100 Rhines Hall, Gainesville, FL, 32611, United States
Nate Stevens
Affiliation:
nstevens@erc.ufl.edu, University of Florida, Particle Engineering Research Center, P.O. Box 116135, Gainesville, FL, 32611, United States
Jeff Opalko
Affiliation:
opalko@sinmat.com, Sinmat Inc., 2153 Hawthorne Road,, Suite 129 (Box 2), Gainesville, FL, 32641, United States
Deepika Singh
Affiliation:
singh@sinmat.com, Sinmat Inc., 2153 Hawthorne Road,, Suite 129 (Box 2),, Gainesville, FL, 32641, United States
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Abstract

A novel technique was developed to create superhydrophobic polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) surface using nanosecond pulse electron deposition (PED) technique. The PTFE or Teflon thin films deposited on silicon substrate showed superhydrophobicity evidenced by the contact angle of 166±2 degrees. The SEM micrographs reveal the clustered growth of the deposited film and two level sub-micron asperities which is corroborated by the AFM. FTIR and contact angle studies were conducted to study the chemical nature and the wetting properties of the films.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2007

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References

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