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Microstructures in Pb(In1/2Nb1/2)O3 with the Perovskite B-site Randomness

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 February 2012

S. Mori
Affiliation:
Osaka Prefecture University, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531, Japan
K. Kurushima
Affiliation:
Toray Research Center, Ohtsu, Shiga 520-8567, Japan.
K. Kobayashi
Affiliation:
Osaka Prefecture University, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531, Japan
H. Ohwa
Affiliation:
Gifu University, Gifu 501-1193, Japan.
N. Yasuda
Affiliation:
Gifu University, Gifu 501-1193, Japan.
K. Ohwada
Affiliation:
Spring 8, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Sayo-cho, Hyogo 679-5148, Japan
Corresponding
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Abstract

We have investigated microstructures in both the antiferroelectric (AFE) and relaxor states of Pb(In1/2Nb1/2)O3 (PIN) with the perovskite structure by a transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Electron diffraction (ED) experiments revealed that the AFE state is characterized as the modulated structure with the modulation vector of q =1/4 1/4 0. High-resolution TEM images clearly show the coexistence of two types of domains consisting of the modulated and the nonmodulated structures with the 100 ∼ 200 nm size. On the other hand, in the relaxor state there appear two types of diffuse scatterings in the ED patterns. One is diffuse spots at the 1/2 1/2 0-type reciprocal positions and the other is diffuse streaks elongating along the <110> direction around the fundamental spots. The real-space TEM images clearly demonstrate the presence of nanodomains with the average size of ∼ 5 nm. These nanodomains in the relaxor state should be responsible for the characteristic dielectric properties.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2012

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Microstructures in Pb(In1/2Nb1/2)O3 with the Perovskite B-site Randomness
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