Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Microstructural Evolution and Order-Disorder Transitions in Mesoporous Silica Films Studied by FTIR Spectroscopy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Plinio Innocenzi
Affiliation:
Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, settore materiali, Università di Padova, via Marzolo 9, 35131 Padova, Italy
Paolo Falcaro
Affiliation:
Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, settore materiali, Università di Padova, via Marzolo 9, 35131 Padova, Italy
David Grosso
Affiliation:
Chimie de la Matière Condensée, Université Paris 6 - T54 -E5, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 - France
Florence Babonneau
Affiliation:
Chimie de la Matière Condensée, Université Paris 6 - T54 -E5, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 - France
Get access

Abstract

Silica mesoporous thin films have been synthesised with a self-assembling process employing cetyltrimethylammonium bromide as the organic template and tetraethyl orthosilicate as the silica source. Mesoporous films with Pm3n cubic phase phases have been obtained and the films have been thermally treated in air with a progressive heating schedule from asdeposited up to 1000°C. The evolution of the microstructure has been studied with transmission Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy.

FTIR spectra of the as-deposited films have shown the presence of cyclic species, which at temperatures larger than 350°C have been no more observed. In the 1000-1300 cm-1 region several overlapped absorption bands have been detected. In particular, the pair LO3-TO3, the cyclic species absorption bands and the pair LO4-TO4 have been resolved. These last bands, in particular, are associated with disorder-order transitions in the silica microstructure. These disorder-induced optical modes are due to the large interface area and related to bond strains.

The evolution of the bands in the 1000-1300 cm-1 region has been followed with the Berreman configuration, performing the transmission FTIR analysis at 45° with respect to the normal incidence angle. The LO3 band, which in silica sol-gel films is indicative of the network condensation and is activated by scattering of the light in the pores, was resolved as a single sharp band from 250°C.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2002

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

1. Gnado, J., Dhamelincourt, P., Pelegris, C., Traisnel, M. and Mayot, A. Le Maguer, J.Non- Cryst. Solids 208, 247 (1996).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2. Matos, M.C., Ilharco, L.M. and Almeida, R.M., J.Non-Cryst.Solids 147&148, 232 (1992).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3. Wood, D.L. and Rabinovich, E.M., J.Non-Cryst.Solids 82, 171 (1986).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4. Wood, D.L. and Rabinovich, E.M., Appl.Spectrosc., 43, 263 (1989).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
5. Almeida, R.M., Guiton, T.A. and Pantano, G.C., J.Non-Cryst.Solids 121, 193 (1990).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
6. Bertoluzza, A., Fagnano, C., Morelli, M.A., Gottardi, V., and Guglielmi, M., J.Non- Cryst.Solids 48, 117 (1982).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
7. Yoshino, H., Kamiya, K. and Nasu, H., J.Non-Cryst.Solids 126, 68 (1990).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
8. Klotz, M., Albouy, P.A, Ayral, A., Menager, C., Grosso, D., Lee, A. Van der, Cabuil, V., Babonneau, F., and Guizard, C., Chem.Mater. 1, 1721 (2000).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
9. Grosso, D., Balkenende, A.R., Albouy, P.A., Ayral, A., Amenitsch, H., Babonneau, F., Chem.Mater. 13, 1848 (2001).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
10. S, K.H. Kung, Hayes, K.F., Langmuir 9, 263 (1993).Google Scholar
11. Galeener, F.L., Phys.Rev.B 19, 4292 (1979).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
12. Yoshino, H., Kamiya, K. and Nasu, H., J.Non-Cryst.Solids 126, 68 (1990).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
13. Hayakawa, S. and Hench, L.L., J.Non-Cryst.Solids 262, 264 (2000).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
15. Almeida, R.M. and Pantano, C.G., J.Appl.Phys., 68, 4225 (1990).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
16. Fidalgo, A., Nunes, T.G., Ilharco, L.M., J.Sol-Gel Sci.Techn. 19, 403 (2000).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
17. Ying, J.Y. and Benziger, J.B., J.Non-Cryst.Solids 147&148 (1992) 222 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
18. Van Beck, J.J., Seykens, D., J.Jansen, B.H. and Schuiling, R.D., J.Non-Cryst.Solids 134, 14 (1991).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
19. Sen, P.N. and Thorpe, M.F., Phys. Rev. B 15, 4030 (1977).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
20. Galeener, F.L., Phys.Rev. B 19, 4292 (1979).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
21. Berreman, D.W., Phys. Rev. 130, 2193 (1963).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
22. Primeau, N., Vautey, C. and Langlet, M., Thin Solid Films 310, 47 (1997).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
23. Kirk, C.T., Phys. Rev. B 38, 1255 (1988).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
24. Galeener, F.L. and Lucovsky, G., Phys. Rev. Lett. 37, 1474 (1976).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
25. Lange, P., J.Appl.Phys. 66, 201 (1989).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
26. Lange, P. and Windrabcke, W., Thin Solid Films 174, 159 (1989).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
27. Lange, P., Schnakenberg, U., Ullerich, S. and Schliwinski, H.J., J.Appl.Phys. 68, 3532 (1990)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
28. Perez-Robles, J.F., Garcia-Cerda, L.A., Espinoza-Beltran, F.J., Yanez-Limon, M., Gonzalez-Hernandez, J., Vorobiev, Y.V., Parga-Torres, J.R., Ruiz, F. and Mendez-Nonell, J., Phys.Stat.Sol. 172, 49 (1999).3.0.CO;2-I>CrossRefGoogle Scholar
29. Keene, M.T.J., Gougeon, R.D.M., Denoyel, R., Harris, R.K., Rouquerol, J., Llwellyn, P.L., J.Mater.Chem. 9, 2843 (1999).CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 5 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 26th January 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Hostname: page-component-898fc554b-wphb9 Total loading time: 0.285 Render date: 2021-01-26T16:51:53.104Z Query parameters: { "hasAccess": "0", "openAccess": "0", "isLogged": "0", "lang": "en" } Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false }

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Microstructural Evolution and Order-Disorder Transitions in Mesoporous Silica Films Studied by FTIR Spectroscopy
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Microstructural Evolution and Order-Disorder Transitions in Mesoporous Silica Films Studied by FTIR Spectroscopy
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Microstructural Evolution and Order-Disorder Transitions in Mesoporous Silica Films Studied by FTIR Spectroscopy
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *