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Metal-Induced Nickel Silicide Nanowire Growth Mechanism in the Solid State Reaction

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011


Joondong Kim
Affiliation:
jk74@buffalo.edu, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Electrical Engineering, 207 Bonner Hall, Buffalo, NY, 14260, United States, (716) 645-3115 Ext. 1215, (716) 645-3656
Jong-Uk Bae
Affiliation:
jbae4@buffalo.edu, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Electrical Engineering, Buffalo, NY, 14260, United States
Wayne A. Anderson
Affiliation:
waanders@eng.buffalo.edu, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Electrical Engineering, Buffalo, NY, 14260, United States
Hyun-Mi Kim
Affiliation:
hyunmi@snu.ac.kr, Seoul National University, Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul, N/A, 151-742, Korea, Republic of
Ki-Bum Kim
Affiliation:
kibum@snu.ac.kr, Seoul National University, Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul, N/A, 151-742, Korea, Republic of

Abstract

A unique nanowire growth was accomplished at 575 oC by the metal-induced growth (MIG). That is a spontaneous reaction between metal and Si. The deposited metal worked as a catalyst layer to grow nanowire in the solid-state. Various metals (Ni, Co, and Pd) were used in MIG nanowire fabrication and Ni-induced case was successful in demonstrating that metal species should be a dominant mover in nanowire growth. Transmission electron microscopy investigation was performed to observe the nanowire growth direction. The Ni to Si composition was studied by energy dispersive spectroscopy showing the Ni diffusion inside the nanowire as well as the Ni silicide layer. The practical application MIG nanowire was proven by fabricating nanoscale contacts.


Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2006

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