Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-66nw2 Total loading time: 0.187 Render date: 2021-12-08T14:00:19.930Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Improved Uranium Recovery from the Process Streams in an Electroplating Facility

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 February 2011

John B. Pickett*
Affiliation:
E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company Savannah River Laboratory, Aiken, South Carolina 29808
Get access

Abstract

Cylindrical uranium slugs are used as irradiation targets in the production reactors at the Savannah River Plant. These slugs are first chemically etched, nickel plated, encased in aluminum, inspected, and individually pressure tested. An improved process was developed to recover the uranium from the acidic etching streams by controlling pH and the PO4 to U ratio so that the precipitation of the uranium as hydrogen uranyl phosphate was maximized. Bench scale tests demonstrated that the recovery of uranium could be increased to greater than 99.9% (vs. the current level of about 95% recovery). The recommended changes involved the addition of process effluent “hold” tanks. The addition of the various process streams to the neutralization/precipitation tank could therefore be controlled to maintain a consistent ratio of uranyl nitrate and phosphoric acid. Also, it was determined that a strong caustic solution (resulting from the dissolution of rejected aluminum slugs) could be utilized to neutralize the nitric and phosphoric acid solutions. The buffering action of the aluminum in the “caustic recovery solution” would reduce the sensitivity of the hydrogen uranyl phosphate precipitation to the phosphate ion concentration.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1985

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

1. Muto, T., Hirono, S., and Kurata, H. “Some Aspects of Fixation of Uranium from Natural Waters.” Min. Geol. (Tokyo), 15, pp. 287298 (1965).Google Scholar
2. Langmuir, D. “Uranium Solution-Mineral Equilibria at Low Temperatures with Applications to Sedimentary Ore Deposits.” Geochemica et Cosmochimica Acta., 42, pp. 547569 (1978).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3. Marcus, Y. “Anion Exchange of Metal Complexes: The Uranyl Phosphate System.” Proc. of the 2nd U.N. International Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy, 3, p 465 (1958).Google Scholar
4. Emsley, J. and Hall, D. “The Chemistry of Phosphorus.” John Wiley and Sons, New York, NY, p 18 (1976).Google Scholar
5. Kleinburg, J., Argersinger, W. J. Jr., and Griswold, E. “Inorganic Chemistry,” D. E. Heath and Co., Boston, MA, p 654 (1960).Google Scholar
6. Wilkinson, W. D. “Uranium Metallurgy, Vol. 1, Uranium Process Metallurgy,” John Wiley and Sons, New York, NY, p 95 (1962).Google Scholar
7. Metzger, F. J. and Heidelberger, M. J. Am. Chem. Soc., 31, p. 1040 (1909).CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Improved Uranium Recovery from the Process Streams in an Electroplating Facility
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Improved Uranium Recovery from the Process Streams in an Electroplating Facility
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Improved Uranium Recovery from the Process Streams in an Electroplating Facility
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *