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High Pressure-High Temperature Reactions in Xenon-Chlorine System

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 February 2011

Maddury Somayazulu
Affiliation:
zulu@gl.ciw.edu, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Geophysical Laboratory, 5251 Broad Branch Rd. NW, Washington, VA, 20015, United States, (202)478-8911, (202)478-8901
Steven Gramsch
Affiliation:
s.gramsch@gl.ciw.edu, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Geophysical Laboratory, 5251 Broad Branch Rd. NW, Washington, VA, 20015, United States
Ho-Kwang Mao
Affiliation:
mao@gl.ciw.edu, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Geophysical Laboratory, 5251 Broad Branch Rd. NW, Washington, VA, 20015, United States
Russell Hemley
Affiliation:
hemley@gl.ciw.edu, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Geophysical Laboratory, 5251 Broad Branch Rd. NW, Washington, VA, 20015, United States
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Abstract

We present results of studies of the xenon-chlorine system to 60 GPa and temperature range 300 to 2000 K. Using a combination of Raman spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy and synchrotron x-ray diffraction; we characterize the products of diamond cell experiments. In the 2-20 GPa pressure interval, we observe the formation of a deep red crystalline phase. Above 15 GPa, and at high temperature, a solid solution of Xe and Cl2 appears to form. Comparison of the ultraviolet-visible and infrared absorption measurements on the proposed alloy of Xe and Cl2 show that band edge moves into the visible range at high pressure

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2007

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References

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