Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-559fc8cf4f-rz424 Total loading time: 0.26 Render date: 2021-03-08T07:13:52.971Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Glycocalyx Enhances Prosthetic Vascular Graft Infection

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 February 2011

B. Mark Evers
Affiliation:
Department of Surgery, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, Kentucky 40292.
Beverly L. Giammara
Affiliation:
Department of Surgery, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, Kentucky 40292.
Denise Jubenville
Affiliation:
Department of Surgery, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, Kentucky 40292.
Mark A. Malangoni
Affiliation:
Department of Surgery, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, Kentucky 40292.
Get access

Abstract

Coagulase-negative staphylococci are major pathogens in prosthetic implant infections, and the capability of certain strains to produce glycocalyx enhances their infectivity. We investigated the importance of glycocalyx in an animal model of prosthetic vascular graft infection. Coagulasenegative staphylococci (5×108) and 1 cm2 pieces of Dacron or polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) grafts were placed in subcutaneous pockets of adult Sprague-Dawley rats. Two strains of bacteria were used, one producing and the other not producing glycocalyx. At 5 days, uninfected grafts were incorporated into the surrounding tissues whereas infected grafts were surrounded by fluid. Grafts were excised and adherent bacteria dislodged by sonication and quantitated. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed the presence of bacteria and glycocalyx, and the efficiency of bacterial dislodgement by sonication. The bacterial adherence (CFU/cm2 mean ± SE) of glycocalyx-producing staphylococci was 3.7±1.1×107 and 3.5±1.0×105 to Dacron and PTFE, respectively (both < 0.05). Nonglycocalyx producing bacteria had decreased adherence to both Dacron (1.4±0.8×104) and PTFE (0.9±0.4±104). Antibiotic administration reduced the adherence of the nonglycocalyx producing strain by one log to both materials (p<0.05) but did not affect the glycocalyx-producing strain. These data demonstrate that glycocalyx production enhances the adherence of coagulase-negative staphylococci to prosthetic vascular graft materials. Prophylactic antibiotic administration does little to inhibit the adherence of glycocalyxproducing bacteria but does affect nonglycocalyx producing strains.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1988

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

1. Christensen, G.D., Simpson, W.A., Bisno, A.L., et al. Infect. Immun. 37, 318 (1982).Google Scholar
2. Schmitt, D.D., Bandyk, D.F., Pequet, A.J., et al, Arch. Surg. 121, 89 (1986).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3. Sabath, L.D., Casey, J.I., Ruch, P.A., et al, Antimicrobial Agents Chemother. 83 (1970).Google Scholar
4. McDowell, E.M., in Diagnostic Electron Microscopy, edited by Trump, B.F. and Jones, R.T. (John Wiley and Sons, New York, 1978), pp 113139.Google Scholar
5. Lowy, F.D., Hammer, S.M., Ann. Intern. Med. 99, 834 (1983).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
6. Bunt, T.J., Surgery 93, 733 (1983).Google Scholar
7. Bayston, R., Penny, S.R., Dev. Med. Child Neurol. 14, 25 (1972).Google Scholar
8. Marrie, T.J., Noble, M.A., Costerton, J.W., J. Clin. Microbiol. 18, 1388 (1983).Google Scholar
9. Peters, G., Locci, R., Pulverer, G., J. Infect. Dis. 146, 379 (1982).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
10. Franson, T.R., Sheth, N.K., Rose, H.D., et al, J. Clin. Microbiol. 20, 500 (1984).Google Scholar
11. Johnson, G.M., Quie, P.G., et al, 24th ICAAC, Abstract 55 (1984).Google Scholar
12. Gray, E.D., Peters, G., Verstezen, M., et al, Lancet 1, 365 (1984).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
13. Costerton, J.W., Geesey, G.G., Cheng, K.J., Sci. Am. 238, 86 (1978).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
14. Harris, J.M., Martin, L.F., Ann. Surg. 206, 612 (1987).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
15. Christensen, G.D., Simpson, W.A., Bisno, A.L., et al, Infect. Immun. 40, 407 (1983).Google Scholar
16. Hogt, A.H., Dankert, J., DeVries, J.A., et al, J. Gen. Microbiol. 129, 2959 (1983).Google Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 8 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 8th March 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Glycocalyx Enhances Prosthetic Vascular Graft Infection
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Glycocalyx Enhances Prosthetic Vascular Graft Infection
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Glycocalyx Enhances Prosthetic Vascular Graft Infection
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *