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Gas Phase Electronic Sensing Using Single Wall Carbon Nanotube/Boipolymer Hybrids

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Samuel M Khamis
Affiliation:
smk@physics.upenn.edu, University of Pennsylvania, Physics and Astronomy, 209 S 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA, 19104, United States, 215-898-0556
Michelle Chen
Affiliation:
Chenm@seas.upenn.edu, University of Pennsylvania, Materials Science and Engineering, Philadelphia, PA, 19104, United States
A.T. Charlie Johnson
Affiliation:
cjohnson@physics.upenn.edu, University of Pennsylvania, Physics and Astronomy, Philadelphia, PA, 19104, United States
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Abstract

We report on a class of hybrid sensors involving single-walled carbon nanotube field effect transistors (SWNT FET's) functionalized with various oligonucleotides. These oligonucleotides include ten sequences of single stranded DNA and two sequences of single stranded. We show that the sequence of the adsorbed oligonucleotide is the key component in determining the response that the hybrid will experience upon exposure to a panel of five volatile organic compounds (VOC's). Our sensors present a change in conductance, which is specific to the analyte being tested, and the adsorbed species. Our devices respond and recover quickly (seconds), and are reproducible over ∼100 cycles. These traits are highly desirable for the creation of a technology for use as an electronic nose. We present a database of responses involving hundreds of devices.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2008

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References

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