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“Fast” and “Slow” Metastable Defects in a-Si:H

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 January 1993

Liyou Yang
Affiliation:
Solarex Corporation, Thin Film Division, Newtown, PA 18940
Liang-Fan Chen
Affiliation:
Solarex Corporation, Thin Film Division, Newtown, PA 18940
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Abstract

A two-step light soaking experiment at high and low intensities provided convincing evidence that defect generation and annealing in a-Si:H are controlled by defect states of different characteristics. We point out that the total defect density by itself cannot uniquely determine the state of material or be described by a single rate equation, even though it might be the only quantity that is experimentally measurable. A system of rate equations for all defect components, therefore, must be established in order to accurately describe the defect kinetics. A simple two-component model in which defects are categorized as “fast” or “slow” is shown to be adequate to explain a variety of experimental results in a consistent fashion.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1993

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