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Evolution of nucleation sites and bubble precursors in silicon as a function of helium implanted dose

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Changlong Liu
Affiliation:
CERI-CNRS, 3A Rue de la Férollerie, 45071 Orléans CEDEX, France
R. Delamare
Affiliation:
CERI-CNRS, 3A Rue de la Férollerie, 45071 Orléans CEDEX, France
E. Ntsoenzok
Affiliation:
CERI-CNRS, 3A Rue de la Férollerie, 45071 Orléans CEDEX, France
G. Regula
Affiliation:
UMR TECSEN, University of Marseille-Faculté des Sciences et Techniques 231, 13397 Marseille CEDEX 20, France
B. Pichaud
Affiliation:
UMR TECSEN, University of Marseille-Faculté des Sciences et Techniques 231, 13397 Marseille CEDEX 20, France
A.Van Veen
Affiliation:
IRI, Delf University of Technology, Delf, The Netherlands
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Abstract

(111) oriented silicon samples were implanted at room temperature with 1.55 MeV 3He ions in the dose range of 5×1015 to 5×1016/cm2. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM) was used to study the evolution of bubbles and extended defects during subsequent thermal annealing at 800°C and 900°C for 30min. The He desorption from bubbles and bubble precursors was measured by means of nuclear reaction analysis (NRA). TEM observations show that no bubbles were observed in Si implanted at doses lower than 1×1016/cm2, while a well-defined cavity band was formed after implantation at 5×1016/cm2 and subsequent thermal annealing. At the intermediary dose of 2×1016/cm2, however, the evolution of bubbles and extended defects is quite different. The bubbles prefer to nucleate in large planar clusters surrounded by a high density of dislocation loops emerging from them. The clusters of bubbles act as the sources of the dislocation loops. NRA measurements indicate that the He desorption behavior is also dose-dependent. The He desorption is achieved much faster in low dose implanted Si. The results are qualitatively discussed.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2002

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