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Electron Speckle and Higher-Order Correlation Functions from Amorphous Thin Films

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 February 2011

J. Murray Gibson
Affiliation:
University of Illinois, Department of Physics, 1110 W Green St, Urbana, IL 61801
M. M. J. Treacy
Affiliation:
NEC Research Institute, 4 Independence Way, Princeton, NJ 08540
D. Loretto
Affiliation:
Division of Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138
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Abstract

We obtain valuable information about medium-range order in amorphous semiconductors from variable coherence microscopy, a new quantitative approach to TEM. The technique reveals three-body and higher-order atomic correlation functions, which are sensitive to medium-range order. Preliminary experimental evidence for structural changes on annealing has been found for amorphous semiconductor films, with pronounced medium-range order seen only in unannealed films.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1997

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