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Effects on Hardness and Elastic Modulus for DSS-8 Peptide Treatment on Remineralization of Human Dental Tissues

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 March 2011

Chia-Chan Hsu
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, U.S.A.
Hsiu-Ying Chung
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, U.S.A. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Feng Chia University, Taichung 407, Taiwan, Republic of China
Elizabeth Marie Hagerman
Affiliation:
Department of Bioengineering, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, U.S.A.
Wenyuan Shi
Affiliation:
School of Dentistry, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095, U.S.A.
Jenn-Ming Yang
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, U.S.A.
Ben Wu
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, U.S.A. Department of Bioengineering, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, U.S.A.
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Abstract

Dental remineralization may be achieved by mediating the interactions between tooth surfaces with free ions and biomimetic peptides. We recently developed octuplet repeats of aspartate-serine-serine (DSS-8) peptide, which occurs in high abundance in naturally occurring proteins that are critical for tooth remineralization. In this paper, we evaluated the possible role of DSS-8 in enamel remineralization. Human enamel specimens were demineralized, exposed briefly to DSS-8 solution, and then exposed to concentrated ionic solutions that favor remineralization. Enamel nano-mechanical behaviors, hardness and elastic modulus, at various stages of treatment were determined by nanoindentation. The phase, microstructure and morphology of the resultant surfaces were characterized using the grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXD), variable pressure scanning electron microscopy (VPSEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM), respectively. Nanoindentation results show that the DSS-8 remineralization effectively improves the mechanical and elastic properties for demineralized enamel.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2009

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