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Effects of Elevated Temperature Hydrogen Exposure on the Microstructure of α 2- and γ-Based Titanium Aluminide Alloys

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 January 1992

D. S. Schwartz
Affiliation:
McDonnell Douglas Aerospace, PO Box 516, m/c 111-1041, St. Louis, MO 63166-0516
R. J. Lederich
Affiliation:
McDonnell Douglas Aerospace, PO Box 516, m/c 111-1041, St. Louis, MO 63166-0516
W. B. Yelon
Affiliation:
University of Missouri-Columbia, Research Reactor Facility, Columbia, MO 65211
Y.-Y. Tang
Affiliation:
University of Missouri-Columbia, Research Reactor Facility, Columbia, MO 65211
S. M. L. Sastry
Affiliation:
Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130
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Abstract

Ti-25Al, Ti-25Al-10Nb-2V, and Ti-25Al-10Nb-3V-1Mo (at. %) α2-based alloys, and Ti-48Al and Ti-52Al γ-based alloys were exposed to gaseous hydrogen at elevated temperatures. A novel ternary hydride was observed in Ti-25Al and Ti-25Al-10Nb-3V-1Mo, identified as Ti3AlH. A highly faulted ternary hydride was seen in two phase α2 + γ Ti-48Al which did not have the crystal structure or chemistry of any known Ti- or Ti-Al-hydride. Very fine, oriented, needle-shaped hydrides were observed in single-phase γ Ti-52Al.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1995

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Effects of Elevated Temperature Hydrogen Exposure on the Microstructure of α 2- and γ-Based Titanium Aluminide Alloys
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