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Drop-by-drop Polymer Deposition by Acoustic Picoliter Droplet Generators for Applications in Semiconductor Industry and Biotechnology

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Grace C. Lee
Affiliation:
Demirci Bio-Acoustic MEMS Lab, Health Sciences and Technology, 65 Landsdowne Street, Cambridge, MA, 02139, United States
Jeremiah R Cohen
Affiliation:
yermie@mit.edu, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Bio-Acoustic-MEMS, Cambridge, MA, 02139, United States
Utkan Demirci
Affiliation:
utkan1@gmail.com, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Bio-Acoustic-MEMS, Cambridge, MA, 02139, United States
Corresponding
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Abstract

Photoresist droplets are ejected onto a wafer surface by an acoustic two dimensional micromachined ejector array. The spread of single droplets on a silicon wafer surface at varying droplet speeds is studied. Series of photoresist droplets are printed periodically drop-on-demand on a silicon wafer surface and profiles of a single droplet and two droplets overlapping with varying distances of 25 μm and 1 μm on a silicon wafer are demonstrated. Moreover, 3.4 μm thick spinless full coverage of a 4 inch wafer with photoresist is demonstrated which indicates a potential for coating wafers in less than a few seconds.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2007

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Drop-by-drop Polymer Deposition by Acoustic Picoliter Droplet Generators for Applications in Semiconductor Industry and Biotechnology
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