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Design of Ultra High Vacuum Scanning Electron Microscope Combined with Scanning Tunneling Microscope

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 February 2011

Mikio Takai
Affiliation:
Faculty of Engineering Science and Research Center for Extreme Materials, Osaka University, Toyonaka, 560 Osaka, Japan
Naoki Yokoi
Affiliation:
Faculty of Engineering Science and Research Center for Extreme Materials, Osaka University, Toyonaka, 560 Osaka, Japan
Ryou Mimura
Affiliation:
EIKO Engineering Co., Ltd., 50 Yamazaki, Nakaminato, Ibaraki 311-12, Japan
Hiroshi Sawaragi
Affiliation:
EIKO Engineering Co., Ltd., 50 Yamazaki, Nakaminato, Ibaraki 311-12, Japan
Ryuso Aihara
Affiliation:
EIKO Engineering Co., Ltd., 50 Yamazaki, Nakaminato, Ibaraki 311-12, Japan
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Abstract

An ultra high vacuum (UHV) scanning electron microscope (SEM) combined with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) has been designed and constructed to solve problems, arising from STM surface imaging and nanofabrication using STM tips, such as difficulty in probe tip location and change in tip shape. The system facilitates to image and/or to modify a wide range of area from submicron down to subnanometer. A ZrO/W thermal emitter in a Schottky mode has been used for an electron gun to obtain a low energy spread with a high angular current density. Minimum beam spot diameters of 6 and 12 nm with currents of 100 pA and 4 nA are estimated by optical property calculation for high resolution (SEM) and high current (fabrication) modes, respectively.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1993

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