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Counteracting Effects of Boron and Hydrogen on Ductility In Ni3Al

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 February 2011

T. K. Chaki
Affiliation:
State University of New York, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Buffalo, NY 14260
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Abstract

A minute amount of boron doping in polycrystalline Ni3Al can suppress embrit-tlement due to environmental moisture. However, B is ineffective in suppressing hydrogen embrittlement due to cathodic charging. A mechanism is proposed to explain this seemingly contradictory dichotomy. Grain boundaries in B-free Ni3Al contain crack-like microcavities, to the tips of which atomic hydrogen, generated by the reaction of moisture with Al, can diffuse and cause embrittlement. In B-doped Ni3Al interstitial B atoms interact with Ni atoms and reduce the strength of directional bonding between Ni and Al atoms, such that the atoms can relax easily to close up the microcavities, thereby reducing environmental embrittlement. In the presence of a large amount of hydrogen, introduced by cathodic charging, microcracks can be nucleated in B-doped Ni3Al by hydrogen-enhanced dislocation activity, and then hydrogen embrittlement can proceed by enhanced plasticity at the crack tips.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1995

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