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Core-Shell Nanorods for Efficient Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Production

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011


Z. G. Yu
Affiliation:
zhi-gang.yu@sri.com, SRI International, Applied Physical Sciences Laboratory, 333 Ravenswood Ave, Menlo Park, California, 94025, United States, (650) 859-6456, (650) 859-5036
C. E. Pryor
Affiliation:
craig-pryor@uiowa.edu, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, Optical Science and Technology Center and Department of Physics and Astronomy, United States
W. H. Lau
Affiliation:
wlau@mailaps.org, University of California, Santa Barbara, California, Center for Spintronics and Quantum Computation and Department of Physics, United States
M. A. Berding
Affiliation:
martha.berding@sri.com, SRI International, Menlo Park, California
D. B. MacQueen
Affiliation:
brent.macqueen@sri.com, SRI International, Menlo Park, California, United States

Abstract

We propose core-shell InP-CdS and InP-ZnTe nanorods as photoelectrodes in the efficient photoelectrochemical hydrogen production. Based on our systematic study using strain-dependent k.p theory, we find that in these heterostructures both energies and wave-function distributions of electrons and holes can be favorably tailored to a considerable extent by exploiting the interplay between quantum confinement and strain. Consequently, these core-shell nanorods with proper dimensions (height, core radius, and shell thickness) can simultaneously satisfy all criteria for effective photoelectrodes in solar-based hydrogen production.


Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2006

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