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Cooling of Hot Electrons in Amorphous Silicon

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 February 2011

R. Vanderhaghen
Affiliation:
Laboratoire de Physique des Interfaces et Couches Minces (UPR A 258 CNRS), Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau, France, vander@poly.polytechnique.fr
D. Hulin
Affiliation:
Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquée, ENSTA - Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau, France
S. Cuzeau
Affiliation:
Laboratoire de Physique, Université de Bourgogne, Dijon, France
J. O. White
Affiliation:
Laboratoire de Physique, Université de Bourgogne, Dijon, France Now at Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana
Corresponding
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Abstract

Measurements of the cooling rate of hot carriers in amorphous silicon are made with a two-pump, one-probe technique. The experiment is simulated with a rate-equation model describing the energy transfer between a population of hot carriers and the lattice. An energy transfer rate proportional to the temperature difference is found to be consistent with the experimental data while an energy transfer independent of the temperature difference is not. This contrasts with the situation in crystalline silicon. The measured cooling rates are sufficient to explain the difficulty in observing avalanche effects in amorphous silicon.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1997

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References

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