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Comparative Study of Interface Structure in GaAs/AlAs Superlattices By Tem and Raman Scattering

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 February 2011

T. Nakamura
Affiliation:
Fujitsu Ltd., 10–1, Morinosato, Wakamiya, Atsugi, JAPAN 243–01
M. Ikeda
Affiliation:
Fujitsu Ltd., 10–1, Morinosato, Wakamiya, Atsugi, JAPAN 243–01
S. Muto
Affiliation:
Fujitsu Ltd., 10–1, Morinosato, Wakamiya, Atsugi, JAPAN 243–01
S. Komiya
Affiliation:
Fujitsu Ltd., 10–1, Morinosato, Wakamiya, Atsugi, JAPAN 243–01
I. Umebu
Affiliation:
Fujitsu Ltd., 10–1, Morinosato, Wakamiya, Atsugi, JAPAN 243–01
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Abstract

Transition layers in GaAs/AlAs superlattices were studied by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) observations and Raman scattering measurements. We clarified that arrays of bright spots at the interface in the TEM image is a good indicator of the interfacial configuration and that a high atomic step density with intervals of less than 10 nm is necessary for Raman characterization using confined LO phonons.

We characterized the growth temperature dependence of the transition layers at the GaAs/AlAs interfaces. For a sample grown at 500'C, the extent of the transition layers is about one monolayer and that of the interfacial step intervals is more than 10 nm. For a sample grown at 700 0 C, these values are about two monolayers and less than 3 nm, respectively.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1988

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References

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