Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-78dcdb465f-9mfzn Total loading time: 24.749 Render date: 2021-04-17T11:04:32.883Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Ceramic formulation and processing design for plutonium disposition

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 February 2011

Neil C. Hyatt
Affiliation:
Immobilization Science Laboratory, Department of Engineering Materials, University of Sheffield, Sir Robert Hadfield Building, Mappin Street, Sheffield, S1 3JD, UK
Martin Stennett
Affiliation:
Immobilization Science Laboratory, Department of Engineering Materials, University of Sheffield, Sir Robert Hadfield Building, Mappin Street, Sheffield, S1 3JD, UK
Andreas Jenni
Affiliation:
Immobilization Science Laboratory, Department of Engineering Materials, University of Sheffield, Sir Robert Hadfield Building, Mappin Street, Sheffield, S1 3JD, UK
Daniel Reid
Affiliation:
Immobilization Science Laboratory, Department of Engineering Materials, University of Sheffield, Sir Robert Hadfield Building, Mappin Street, Sheffield, S1 3JD, UK
and Ewan R. Maddrell
Affiliation:
National Nuclear Laboratory, Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria, CA20 1PG, UK
Get access

Abstract

The focus of this research programme is to develop a single phase ceramic wasteform for waste PuO2 that is unsuitable for fuel manufacture. A suite of synthetic mineral systems have been considered including titanate, zirconate, phosphate and silicate based matrices. Although a wealth of information on plutonium disposition in some of the systems exists in the literature, the data is not always directly comparable which hinders comparison between different ceramic hosts. The crux of this research has been to compile a database of information on the proposed hosts to allow impartial comparison of the relative merits of each system.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2009

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

1 Ringwood, E. Kesson, S. E., Ware, N. G., Hibberson, W. O. and Major., A. The SYNROC process: A geochemical approach to nuclear waste immobilisation. Geochemical Journal. 13, 141 (1979).Google Scholar
2 Ebbinghaus, B.B., Armantrout, G. A., Gray, L., Herman, C. C., Shaw, H. F. and VanKonynenburg, R. A.. Plutonium immobilisation project baseline formulation. UCRL-ID-133089 (2000).Google Scholar
3 Ewing, R. C., Weber, W. J. and Lian., J. Nuclear waste disposal – pyrochlore (A2B2O7): Nuclear waste form for the immobilisation of plutonium and “minor” actinides. Journal of Applied Physics. 95, 5949 (2004).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4 Gong, W. L., Lutze, W. and Ewing, R. C.. Zirconia ceramics for excess weapons plutonium waste. Journal of Nuclear Materials. 277, 239 (2000).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
5 Stennett, M. C., Hyatt, N. C., Lee, W. E., and Maddrell, E. R.. Processing and characterisation of fluorite-related ceramic wasteforms for immobilisation of actinides in Environmental Issues and Waste Management Technologies in the Ceramic and Nuclear Industries XI, edited by Herman, C. C., S. Marra, Spearing, D. R., L. Vance, and Vienna, J. D.. Ceramic Transactions. 176, 81 (2006).Google Scholar
6 Lumpkin, G. R., Smith, K. L. and Blackford, M. G.. Partitioning of uranium and rare earth elements in SYNROC: effect of impurities, metal additives, and waste loading. Journal of Nuclear Materials. 224, 31 (1995).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
7 Ewing, R. C.. The design and evaluation of nuclear-waste forms: Clues from mineralogy. Canadian Mineralogist. 39, 697 (2001).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
8 Lumpkin, G. R.. Ceramic waste forms for actinides. Elements. 2, 47 (2006).Google Scholar
9 Donald, I.W., Metcalfe, B. L. and Taylor., R. N. J. The immobilisation of high level nuclear waste using ceramics and glasses. Journal of Materials Science. 32, 5851 (1997).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
10 Fielding, P. E. and White, T. J.. Crystal chemical incorporation of high level waste species in aluminotitanate-based ceramics: Valence, location, radiation damage, and hydrothermal stability. Journal of Materials Research. 2, 387 (1987).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
11 Macfarlane., A. Immobilisation of excess weapons plutonium: A better alternative to glass. Science & Global Security. 7, 271 (1998).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
12 Ewing, R. C.. Plutonium and ‘minor' actinides: Safe sequestration. Earth and Planetary Science Letters. 229, 165 (2005).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
13 Stefanovsky, S. V., Yudintsev, S. V., Giere, R. and Lumpkin, G. R.. Nuclear waste forms in Energy waste and the environment: A geochemical perspective, edited by Giere, R. and Stille., P. Geological Society of London special publication. 236, (2004).Google Scholar
14 Bingham, P. A., Hand, R. J., Stennett, M. C., Hyatt, N. C. and Harrison, M. T.. The use of surrogates in waste immobilisation studies: A case study of plutonium in Scientific Basis for Nuclear Waste Management XXXI, 1107, 421 (2008).Google Scholar
15 Stennett, M. C., Hyatt, N. C., Maddrell, E. R., Gibb, F. G. F., Moebus, G. and Lee, W. E.. Microchemical and crystallographic characterisation of fluorite-based ceramic wasteforms in Scientific Basis for Nuclear Waste Management XXIX, edited by Iseghem., P. Van Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings. 932, 623 (2006).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
16 Stennett, M. C., Maddrell, E. R., Scales, C. R., Livens, F. R., Gilbert, M. and Hyatt, N. C.. An evaluation of single phase ceramic formulations for plutonium disposition in Scientific Basis for Nuclear Waste Management XXX, edited by Dunn, D. S., Poinssot, C., Begg, B.. Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings. 985, (2007).Google Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 15 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 17th April 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Ceramic formulation and processing design for plutonium disposition
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Ceramic formulation and processing design for plutonium disposition
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Ceramic formulation and processing design for plutonium disposition
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *