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Bioactivity of Vitronectin Adsorbed on Nanophase Alumina Promotes Osteoblast Adhesion

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 March 2011


Thomas J. Webster
Affiliation:
Departments of Biomedical Engineering and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180-3590, U.S.A
Linda S. Schalder
Affiliation:
Departments of Materials Science and Engineering Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180-3590, U.S.A
Richard W. Siegel
Affiliation:
Departments of Materials Science and Engineering Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180-3590, U.S.A
Rena Bizios
Affiliation:
Departments of Biomedical Engineering and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180-3590, U.S.A

Abstract

The role of the conformation and bioactivity of adsorbed vitronectin in enhancing osteoblast (the bone-forming cells) adhesion on nanophase (that is, grain sizes less than 100 nm) alumina was investigated in the present in vitro study. Results obtained from surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) provided the first evidence of increased unfolding of vitronectin adsorbed on nanophase alumina. This conclusion was further supported by dose-dependent inhibition of cell adhesion on nanophase alumina pretreated with vitronectin following preincubation of osteoblasts with either Arginine-Glycine-Aspartic Acid-Serine (RGDS) or Lysine-Arginine-Serine-Arginine (KRSR) to block respective cell-membrane receptors. These events, namely enhanced unfolding of vitronectin that leads to exposure of bioactive epitopes (such as RGDS) in adsorbed vitronectin may explain the observed increased osteoblast adhesion on nanophase alumina.


Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2001

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References

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